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Squadron Leader Tom McPhee CB DFC* (deceased) - Art prints and originals signed by Squadron Leader Tom McPhee CB DFC* (deceased)

Tom McPhee

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22 / 2 / 2009Died : 22 / 2 / 2009

Squadron Leader Tom McPhee CB DFC* (deceased)

Born in Greenock in November 1917, Tom McPhee joined the RAFVR in 1938, and at the outbreak of war Tom was called up and posted to 139 Squadron as a Sergeant Pilot flying Blenheims on low level bombing raids. He was commissioned in 1941. In August 1943 he joined 464 Squadron flying Mosquitos, and in February 1944 took part in Operation Jericho when 18 Mosquitos of 140 Wing , nd TAF, attacked the Gestapo held prison at Amiens, liberating over 100 French Resistance fighters, many of whom had been condemned to execution the following morning. Flying number two on the raid he was promoted to Squadron Leader as a result. From June 1944 he was posted to a Forward Control Unit until the end of the war. Sadly passed away 22nd February 2009.


Items Signed by Squadron Leader Tom McPhee CB DFC* (deceased)

 With their twin Merlins singing at full power, Mk FBV1 Mosquitos of 464 Squadron RAAF present a menacing picture as they set out on a precision low level mission, their streamlined, shark-like shapes silhouetted against the evening glow. Below, the ......
Mosquitos at Dusk by Nicolas Trudgian (B)
Price : £300.00
With their twin Merlins singing at full power, Mk FBV1 Mosquitos of 464 Squadron RAAF present a menacing picture as they set out on a precision low level mission, their streamlined, shark-like shapes silhouetted against the evening glow. Below, the ......

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 With their twin Merlins singing at full power, Mk FBV1 Mosquitos of 464 Squadron RAAF present a menacing picture as they set out on a precision low level mission, their streamlined, shark-like shapes silhouetted against the evening glow. Below, the ......
Mosquitos at Dusk by Nicolas Trudgian (C)
SOLD OUT
With their twin Merlins singing at full power, Mk FBV1 Mosquitos of 464 Squadron RAAF present a menacing picture as they set out on a precision low level mission, their streamlined, shark-like shapes silhouetted against the evening glow. Below, the ......NOT
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Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Squadron Leader Tom McPhee CB DFC* (deceased)

Squadron Leader Tom McPhee CB DFC* (deceased)

Squadrons for : Squadron Leader Tom McPhee CB DFC* (deceased)
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Squadron Leader Tom McPhee CB DFC* (deceased). A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.139 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 3rd July 1918
Fate : reformed again at RAF Wittering on 1 January 1962 with the Handley Page Victor B2, before it was finally disbanded on 31 December 1968.
Jamaica

Si placet necamus - We destroy at will

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No.139 Sqn RAF

No. 139 Squadron was formed at Villaverla, Italy, on 3rd July 1918, as a fighter-reconnaissance squadron equipped with Bristol Fighters, and between that date and the Armistice it claimed the destruction of 27 enemy aircraft (a further seven were classified as "probably destroyed"). Disbanded in 1919, The squadron reformed on 3 September 1936 at Wyton, equipped first with Hawker Hinds and then Bristol Blenheims. On 3 September 1939 a Blenheim IV of the squadron piloted by Andrew McPherson was the first British aircraft to cross the German coast after Britain had declared war on Germany. On 4 September 1939, Nos. 110, 107 and 139 Squadrons led the first RAF air raid of the war against German shipping near Wilhelmshaven. In December 1939, the squadron was moved to Betheniville, France and in May 1940 when based at Plivot it was overrun by the German advance and lost most of its aircraft. In December 1941, the squadron converted to the Lockheed Hudson aircraft, which it operated in Burma until April 1942. In June 1942, the squadron returned to England and re-equipped with the Blenheim V before quickly switching to the de Havilland Mosquito at Horsham St. Faith. On 3 March, it carried out a daring air raid on the molybdenum processing plant at Knaben in Norway. It is believed that this was one of the raids on which the fictional work 633 Squadron was based. As a result of this raid a number of flight crew received decorations. On 20 March, the squadron lost a number of aircraft a week before the official announcement of the decorations. In the summer of 1943 No. 139 Squadron changed over to night raiding and joined the Pathfinder Force, its early work with the PFF consisting mainly of preceding waves of heavy bombers to drop Window (thin strips of metal foil) and so confuse the enemy's early warning radar, and making "spoof" raids on other targets to divert enemy night fighters from the primary target attacked by the "heavies". In 1944 it became an H2S-equipped Mosquito marker squadron and during the year visited a long list of the most famous targets in Germany - Berlin, Hamburg, Cologne, Mannheim, Hanover, Duisburg, Lübeck, and many others. Very many 4,000-lb. "cookies" were dropped on these targets in addition to TIs (target indicators) to guide the main force heavies. Amongst other duties the squadron inaugurated the "Ploughman" raids in which each aircraft dropped a single bomb on each of four different diversionary targets; and it lit the way for minelaying operations in the Kiel Canal. .

No.464 Sqn RAAF


Country : UK
Founded : 15th August 1942
Fate : Disbanded 25th September 1945

Aequo anumo - Equanimity

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.464 Sqn RAAF

No.464 Sqn RAAF

Full profile not yet available.
Aircraft for : Squadron Leader Tom McPhee CB DFC* (deceased)
A list of all aircraft associated with Squadron Leader Tom McPhee CB DFC* (deceased). A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Blenheim


Click the name above to see prints featuring Blenheim aircraft.

Manufacturer : Bristol
Production Began : 1935
Retired : 1956
Number Built : 4422

Blenheim

The Bristol Blenheim, the most plentiful aircraft in the RAFs inventory when WWII began, was designed by Frank Barnwell, and when first flown in 1936 was unique with its all metal monoplane design incorporating a retractable undercarriage, wing flaps, metal props, and supercharged engines. A typical bomb load for a Blenheim was 1,000 pounds. In the early stages of the war Blenheims were used on many daylight bombing missions. On the day that war was declared on Germany, a Blenheim piloted by Flying Officer Andrew McPherson was the first British aircraft to cross the German coast and the following morning 15 Blenheims from three squadrons set off on one of the first bombing missions The Blenheim units operated throughout the battle, often taking heavy casualties, although they were never accorded the publicity of the fighter squadrons. The Blenheim units raided German occupied airfields throughout July to December 1940, both during daylight hours and at night. Although most of these raids were unproductive, there were some successes; on 1 August five out of 12 Blenheims sent to attack Haamstede and Evere (Brussels) were able to bomb, destroying or heavily damaging three Bf 109s of II./JG 27 and apparently killing a Staffelkapitän identified as Hauptmann Albrecht von Ankum-Frank. Two other 109s were claimed by Blenheim gunners. Another successful raid on Haamstede was made by a single Blenheim on 7 August which destroyed one 109 of 4./JG 54, heavily damaged another and caused lighter damage to four more. There were also some missions which produced an almost 100% casualty rate amongst the Blenheims. One such operation was mounted on 13 August 1940 against a Luftwaffe airfield near Aalborg in north-western Denmark by 12 aircraft of 82 Squadron. One Blenheim returned early (the pilot was later charged and due to appear before a court martial, but was killed on another operation); the other 11, which reached Denmark, were shot down, five by flak and six by Bf 109s. Blenheim-equipped units had been formed to carry out long-range strategic reconnaissance missions over Germany and German-occupied territories, as well as bombing operations. In this role, the Blenheims once again proved to be too slow and vulnerable against Luftwaffe fighters and they took constant casualties While great heroism was displayed by the air crews, tremendous losses were sustained during these missions. The Blenhiem was easy pickings at altitude for German Bf-109 fighters who quickly learned to attack from below. To protect the vulnerable bellies of the Blenheims many missions were shifted to low altitude, but this increased the aircrafts exposure to anti-aircraft fire. In the German night-bombing raid on London on 18 June 1940, Blenheims accounted for five German bombers, thus proving that they were better-suited for night fighting. In July, No. 600 Squadron, by then based at RAF Manston, had some of its Mk IFs equipped with AI Mk III radar. With this radar equipment, a Blenheim from the Fighter Interception Unit (FIU) at RAF Ford achieved the first success on the night of 2–3 July 1940, accounting for a Dornier Do 17 bomber. More successes came, and before long the Blenheim proved itself invaluable as a night fighter. One Blenheim pilot, Squadron Leader Arthur Scarf, was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross for an attack on Singora, Thailand, on 9 December 1941. Another bomber of No. 60 Squadron RAF was credited with shooting down Lt Col Tateo Katō's Nakajima Ki-43 fighter and badly damaging two others in a single engagement on 22 May 1942, over the Bay of Bengal. Katō's death was a severe blow to the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force.

Mosquito




Click the name above to see prints featuring Mosquito aircraft.

Manufacturer : De Havilland
Production Began : 1940
Retired : 1955
Number Built : 7781

Mosquito

Used as a night fighter, fighter bomber, bomber and Photo-reconnaissance, with a crew of two, Maximum speed was 425 mph, at 30,300 feet, 380mph at 17,000ft. and a ceiling of 36,000feet, maximum range 3,500 miles. the Mosquito was armed with four 20mm Hospano cannon in belly and four .303 inch browning machine guns in nose. Coastal strike aircraft had eight 3-inch Rockets under the wings, and one 57mm shell gun in belly. The Mossie at it was known made its first flight on 25th November 1940, and the mosquito made its first operational flight for the Royal Air Force as a reconnaissance unit based at Benson. In early 1942, a modified version (mark II) operated as a night fighter with 157 and 23 squadron's. In April 1943 the first De Haviland Mosquito saw service in the Far east and in 1944 The Mosquito was used at Coastal Command in its strike wings. Bomber Commands offensive against Germany saw many Mosquitos, used as photo Reconnaissance aircraft, Fighter Escorts, and Path Finders. The Mosquito stayed in service with the Royal Air Force until 1955. and a total of 7781 mosquito's were built.

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