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Defiant - Aircraft Details - Boulton Paul : Defiant : BOULTON PAUL DEFIANT Built as a fighter, with a crew of two. Maximum speed of 304 mph, and a ceiling of 30,350 feet. armament on the defiant was four .303 browing machine guns in the Boulton Paul Turret. Designed as a intercepter fighter, the Defiant first flew in August 1937. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in October 1939 with no 264 squadron. and first flew in operations in march 1940 the Boulton Paul Defiant was certainly no match for the German Fighters, due to their lack of fire power as the defiant had no wing mounted machine guns. Heavy losses. The aircraft was re deployed as a night -Fighter in the autumn of 1940. This role also being taken over by Bristol Beaufighters in 1941, leaving the defiant for training, target tug, and air-sea rescue roles. A Total of 1075 Boulton Paul Defiant's were built . Boulton Paul : Defiant"> . BOULTON PAUL DEFIANT Built as a fighter, with a crew of two. Maximum speed of 304 mph, and a ceiling of 30,350 feet. armament on the defiant was four .303 browing machine guns in the Boulton Paul Turret. Designed as a intercepter fighter, the Defiant first flew in August 1937. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in October 1939 with no 264 squadron. and first flew in operations in march 1940 the Boulton Paul Defiant was certainly no match for the German Fighters, due to their lack of fire power as the defiant had no wing mounted machine guns. Heavy losses. The aircraft was re deployed as a night -Fighter in the autumn of 1940. This role also being taken over by Bristol Beaufighters in 1941, leaving the defiant for training, target tug, and air-sea rescue roles. A Total of 1075 Boulton Paul Defiant's were built . Boulton Paul">

Defiant

Manufacturer : Boulton Paul
Number Built : 1075
Production Began : 1939
Retired :
Type :

BOULTON PAUL DEFIANT Built as a fighter, with a crew of two. Maximum speed of 304 mph, and a ceiling of 30,350 feet. armament on the defiant was four .303 browing machine guns in the Boulton Paul Turret. Designed as a intercepter fighter, the Defiant first flew in August 1937. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in October 1939 with no 264 squadron. and first flew in operations in march 1940 the Boulton Paul Defiant was certainly no match for the German Fighters, due to their lack of fire power as the defiant had no wing mounted machine guns. Heavy losses. The aircraft was re deployed as a night -Fighter in the autumn of 1940. This role also being taken over by Bristol Beaufighters in 1941, leaving the defiant for training, target tug, and air-sea rescue roles. A Total of 1075 Boulton Paul Defiant's were built

Defiant

Defiant Artwork Collection



Night of Defiance by Ivan Berryman.

Guardian of the Night by M A Kinnear.

Boulton Paul Defiants by Barry Price.


Defiant but Doomed by Stan Stokes.

Top Aces for : Defiant
A list of all Aces from our database who are known to have flown this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking the pilots name.
NameVictoriesInfo
Frederick Barker12.00The signature of Frederick Barker features on some of our artwork - click here to see what is available.
Joseph Berry3.00
Squadrons for : Defiant
A list of all squadrons from known to have used this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.125 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st February 1918
Fate : Disbanded 10th May 1957
Newfoundland

Nunquam domandi - Never to be tamed

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No.125 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.141 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st January 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st March 1964

Caedimus noctu - We slay by night

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No.141 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.151 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 12th June 1918
Fate : Disbanded September 1992

Foy pour devoir - Fidelity unto duty

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No.151 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.153 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 4th November 1918
Fate : Disbanded 2nd July 1958

Noctividus - Seeing by night

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No.153 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.255 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 25th July 1918
Fate : Disbanded 30th April 1946

Ad auroram - To the break of dawn

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No.255 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.256 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : June 1918
Fate : Disbanded 21st January 1959

Addimus vim viribus - Strength to strength

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No.256 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.264 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 27th September 1918
Fate : Disbanded 30th November 1962
Madras Presidency

We defy

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No.264 Sqn RAF

264 Squadron was formed from two former Royal Naval Air Service flights, No.439 and No.440, on 27th September 1918 at Souda bay in Crete with the role of anti-submarine patrols, and equipped with the Short 184 floatplanes. The Squadron was disbanded on 1 March 1919. On 8th December 1939 at Martlesham Heath, 264 Squadron was reformed and equipped with the new Boulton Paul Defiant fighter. In March 1940 the squadron started operations doing convoy patrols. After initial successes the Luftwaffe soon realised that the Defiant was vulnerable to frontal attack, and 264 Squadron along with the other Boulton Paul Defiant squadrons started to suffer heavy losses of aircraft and crew. At the end of May 1940, 264 Squadron was withdrawn from operations as a day-fighter squadron and began to train in the night-fighter role. During the Battle of Britain 264 Squadron was used again for day fighting but again suffered losses and returned to the night-fighter role. In May 1942 the squadron was re-equipped with Mosquito II and moved to RAF Colerne, and later receieved the new Mark VI. The squadron operated as night-fighters in the west of England and also in the role of day patrols in the Bay of Biscay and western approaches. 264 Squadron later became part of the 2nd Tactical Air Force providing night patrols over Europe and near the end of the war it was based at Twente in Holland patrolling over Berlin. 264 squadron was disbanded at Twente on 25th August 1945.

No.275 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 15th October 1941
Fate : Disbanded 1st September 1959

Non interibunt - They shall not perish

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No.275 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.276 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 21st October 1941
Fate : Disbanded 14th September 1945

Retrieve

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No.276 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.277 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 22nd December 1941
Fate : Disbanded 15th February 1945

Quaerendo servamus - We save by seeking

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No.277 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.278 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st October 1941
Fate : Disbanded 14th October 1945

Ex mare ad referiendum - From out of the sea to strike again

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No.278 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.285 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st December 1941
Fate : Disbanded 26th June 1945

Respice finem - Consider the end

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No.285 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.286 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 17th November 1941
Fate : Disbanded 16th May 1945

Praesidia nostra exercemus - We exercise our defences

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No.286 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.287 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 19th November 1941
Fate : Disbanded 15th June 1946

C'est en forgeant - Practice makes perfect

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No.287 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.307 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 5th September 1940
Fate : Disbanded 2nd January 1947
Polish

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No.307 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.409 Sqn RCAF


Country : Canada
Founded : 17th June 1941
Fate : Disbanded 1st July 1945

Media nox meridies noster - Midnight is our noon

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No.409 Sqn RCAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.410 Sqn RCAF


Country : Canada
Founded : 30th June 1941
Fate : Disbanded 9th June 1945
Cougar

Noctivaga - Wandering by night

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No.410 Sqn RCAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.456 Sqn RAAF


Country : Australia
Founded : 30th June 1941
Fate : Disbanded 15th June 1945

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No.456 Sqn RAAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.567 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st December 1943
Fate : Disbanded 15th June 1946

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No.567 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.667 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st December 1943
Fate : Disbanded 20th December 1945

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No.667 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.96 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 8th October 1917
Fate : Disbanded 21st January 1959

Nocturni obambulamus - We prowl by night

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No.96 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.
Signatures for : Defiant
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo
Flying Officer Frederick Barker DFM*

Click the name above to see prints signed by Flying Officer Frederick Barker DFM*
16 / 9 / 2015Ace : 12.00 Victories
Flying Officer Frederick Barker DFM*

Flew Defiants with No.264 Sqn.



Wing Commander Eric Barwell

Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Wing Commander Eric Barwell

12 / 12 / 2007Died : 12 / 12 / 2007
Wing Commander Eric Barwell

Born in Suffolk in August 1913, Eric Barwell joined the RAFVR in 1938 to train as a pilot. He was commissioned into No.264 Sqn in February 1940, flying the Boulton-Paul Defiant. His squadron flew in support of the evacuation of Dunkirk, and he claimed two Me109s, two Ju87 Stukas and a Heinkel during this evacuation. However, in the combat with the Heinkel, his aircraft was damaged and he was forced to ditch, managing to put it down in the water between two British destroyers. He and his gunner were rescued by HMS Malcolm. On 24th August, while scrambling to intercept bombers, he and his wingman were attacked by five fighters, his wingman being immediately shot down. His gunner managed to shoot down one of the enemy fighters before the Defiant managed to escape, but it was clear that the aircraft was no match for the German fighters. They were withdrawn from combat and used in a night-time training role. Barwell was awarded the DFC for the six victories scored. In April 1941, he scored a night-time victory over a Heinkel, with a second also probable. He transferred to No.125 Sqn flying Beaufighters, claiming a Dornier damaged on 1st July 1942. By March 1943, No.125 Sqn were equipped with Mosquitoes. He shot down two Ju-88s in this aircraft, and also recorded his final victory, over a V-1 rocket. He was awarded the bar to his DFC and transferred to various experimental squadrons before leaving the RAF in September 1945. Sadly, Eric Barwell died on 12th December 2007.


Squadron Leader Bob Cowper DFC*

Click the name above to see prints signed by Squadron Leader Bob Cowper DFC*
Squadron Leader Bob Cowper DFC*

Joining 153 Sqn flying Defiants, changing to Beaufighters. In 1943 he flew Beaufighters in Malta. With 89 Sqn he crashed in Tunisia, having to walk home 65 miles through the Sahara Desert. Went from 89 Sqn to 108 Sqn and then as an instructor teaching night flying. Joined 456 Sqn RAAF before D-Day, finishing the war on Intruder missions and 6 air victories. He became acting CO of 456 Sqn.



Flight Lieutenant Albert E Gregory DFC

Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant Albert E Gregory DFC

12 / 11 / 2010Died : 12 / 11 / 2010
Flight Lieutenant Albert E Gregory DFC

Albert Gregory was born in Derby on 9th May 1917. Gregory joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in April 1939 as an Airman u/t Wop/Air Gunner. Called up on 1st September and posted to Aldegrove in October to commence Air Gunnery training in December 1939, Albert joined 141 Squadron at Grangemouth as an Air Gunner flying in Blenheims before the squadron converted to Defiants. He could not fly in the Defiant because he was too tall for the turret, so transferred to 219 squadron based at Catterick in May 1940 with whom he served throughout the Battle of Britain on Beaufighters. In September 1940 the introduction of Radar equipped Beaufighters meant Albert Gregory retrained as a Radio Observer and in March 1941 his aircraft accounted for the destruction of a He111. In May 1941, he went to no 2 Radio School at Yatesbury for a Wireless Operators course and passed out from this in September 1941. Albert then served with 23 Sqn in Boston IIIs on intruder patrols over occupied France, Belgium and Holland on bombing and strafing missions, before spending time with 275 and 278 (ASR) Squadrons. On 2nd April 1942 he damaged two Do 17s and in July 1942, Albert Gregory was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and was commissioned in August 1942. Albert later served with 278 (ASR) squadron and was released from the RAF in November 1945 with the rank of Flight Lieutenant. In July 1947 Albert Gregory rejoined the RAF and in February 1948 he was posted to 52 Squadron at Changi, Singapore. The squadron was engaged in Army support supply dropping and troop carrying in the anti-terrorist campaign in Malaya. In 1950 following his return to Britain, Albert became a signals instructor and retired from the RAF in May 1955. Sadly, he passed away on 12th November 2010.


Wing Commander William Gregory DSO, DFC*, AFC, DFM

Click the name above to see prints signed by Wing Commander William Gregory DSO, DFC*, AFC, DFM

6 / 10 / 2001Died : 6 / 10 / 2001
Wing Commander William Gregory DSO, DFC*, AFC, DFM

Radar Operator to Ace Bob Braham, flying Defiants, Beaufighters and Mosquitos, and contributing to 29 victories. Wing Commander Bill Sticks Gregory was Air Interception (AI) radar operator to the Second World War night fighter ace Wing Commander Bob Braham. William James Gregory, was born on November 23rd 1913 at Hartlepool, where he attended the Lister Sealy School. Before the war, he worked for his father as a plasterer, and was drummer in the Debroy Somers Band - earning the nickname Sticks. William James Gregory enlisted in the RAF soon after the outbreak of war, and in May 1940 was posted to No 29.Squadron as a wireless operator/air gunner. Subsequently, he was redesignated observer/radio operator and then radar operator. Before teaming up with Braham, Gregory had a nasty experience when he and his pilot were, as he noted in his logbook, scrambled to intercept Huns raiding Liverpool. They were about to shoot down a Do17 when their Beaufighter was hit in the starboard wing by friendly anti-aircraft fire. Having baled out at 16,000 feet, Gregory landed on the roof of Lime Street station - and as he climbed down to the ground rail passengers mistook him for a German airman and roughed him up. Flight Sergeant William Gregory joined Wing Commander Bob Braham when he stood in temporarily for Brahams usual radar operator, Gregorys superb radar skills helped Braham to destroy 29 German aircraft in the night skies over Britain and occupied Europe - a tally which was among the highest of any wartime RAF fighter pilot, flying by day or night. Their first combat took place in early July 1941. Flying in a twin-engine Bristol Beaufighter of No.29 Squadron over a moonlit Thames Estuary, Gregory called to Braham: Contact dead ahead and at 2,000 yards.As Braham went into a gentle dive to close the range and to get below a Ju 88 bomber, the enemy opened fire. When Gregory urged Braham to open up, Braham said calmly: No, not yet. We must get closer to make sure of him. Despite heavy fire from the Ju88, Braham continued to delay firing, until with three short bursts he sent the bomber blazing down into the Thames. Later that year, after a brief detachment in Scotland to assist No.141 Squadron convert from obsolescent Boulton Paul single-engine Defiants to Beaufighters, Braham and Gregory returned to No.29 at West Malling in Kent. Early in 1942, Gregory was commissioned a pilot officer - a promotion for which Braham had been pressing - and he and Braham were posted as instructors to No.51, a night fighter Operational Training Unit at Cranfield. Keen to return to operations, in early June the two men slipped away for an unofficial weekend visit to their old squadron, No.29, in Kent. During a night sortie, Gregory positioned Braham to attack a Do217 bomber. Braham soon set it alight, and it dived into the sea off Sandwich. Bad weather then caused them to divert to Manston, on the Kent coast. With fog rolling in from the sea, Braham overshot and crash-landed in a ploughed field. After the mishap at Manston, Gregory and Braham returned to No.29 Squadron where Braham became a flight commander. In December 1942 Braham, aged only 22, received command of No.141 Squadron at Ford on the south coast; Gregory, at 29 the old man of the team, stayed with him. One moonlit night, Gregory and most of the squadron aircrew were having a party at Worthing, on the Sussex coast, when they heard enemy aeroplanes overhead. Racing back to their airfield they took off in their waiting Beaufighter. Gregory brought the aircraft to within visual range of a Do 217 bomber, flying at 15,000 feet. There was an exchange of fire in which Braham, having rather enjoyed himself at the party, opened up at too long a range. Gregorys caustic comments quickly sobered Braham up, and in four long bursts he sent the Dornier diving ablaze into the sea. Early in 1943 the squadron moved west to Predannack, near the Lizard Point in Cornwall, mainly for night training. Visiting Fighter Command, Braham urged the use of AI night fighters in support of the bomber offensive over occupied Europe, in which heavy losses were being incurred. Although his proposal was not accepted at this stage, he won approval for moonlight attacks on rail and road traffic on the Brest peninsula. At the end of April 1943 Braham and Gregory led No.141 Squadron to Wittering, near Stamford, Lincolnshire. Their aircraft were now fitted with Serrate, a radar device which enabled Gregory and his fellow operators to home in on enemy fighter transmissions from a distance of up to 100 miles. This was an ideal aid in Gregorys new night-intruding role, and after he and Braham had exchanged their Beaufighter for a de Havilland Mosquito equipped with Serrate, the two men went into action in support of Sir Arthur Harriss bomber formations. One night, flying over Cologne, they were attacked by two enemy night fighters, one of which shot out their port engine, obliging them to make a perilous return back to base. Another night, supporting a raid over Mannheim, Gregory logged a hell of a dogfight. In a 25-minute battle, they destroyed one German aircraft - an Me 110 fighter - and drove off another. In March 1944, Gregory, by now highly experienced, joined the night operations staff at No 2 Group, 2nd Tactical Air Force (2nd TAF) headquarters, where Braham had preceded him. Such was his and Brahams hunger for action that from time to time they would slip away from their desks to freelance on sorties over Europe with various Mosquito squadrons. On one daylight sortie, they destroyed an He 177 heavy bomber which was circling Chateaudun airfield in France at 1,000 feet. Caught in a stream of fire from their Mosquitos nose guns, the bomber, Gregory recalled, reared up like a wounded animal, winged over on its back and dived vertically into the ground. On May 12 1944, Gregory and Braham - truanting again from the operations room - had just taken part in the destruction of a Fw190 fighter off the Danish coast when an Me 109 fighter struck. Short of fuel, and further damaged by anti-aircraft fire, Braham coaxed the stricken aircraft towards home until he had to ditch 70 miles off the Norfolk coast, where they were rescued by two minesweepers. Shortly after that, the team broke up. Braham was shot down and ended the war as a prisoner; Gregory continued staff duties. While Braham accumulated three DSOs, three DFCs and an AFC in the course of his wartime service, Gregory was awarded a DSO, two DFCs, an AFC and a DFM. At the end of the war, Gregory accepted a permanent commission, specialising in navigation and fighter control. He received the Air Efficiency Award in 1946, and after commanding RAF Wartling, in East Sussex, retired in 1964. Thereafter, until final retirement, he worked as an estate agent at Eastbourne. He was a member of Cooden Beach golf club and, having retained his drumming skills, played with a local band. Later in life, so as to be near his daughter, he moved to Camberley, Surrey, where golf, bowls and darts - he was known as The Demon - brought him much enjoyment. Sadly Wing Commander Gregory passed away at the age of 87, on the 6th October 2001


Group Captain Richard Haine OBE DFC

Click the name above to see prints signed by Group Captain Richard Haine OBE DFC

30 / 9 / 2008Died : 30 / 9 / 2008
Group Captain Richard Haine OBE DFC

Richard Dickie Haine was born in St Stephens in October 1916. In 1936, he qualified as an RAF pilot, and flew the Hawker Fury with No.25 Sqn, which re-equipped with Bristol Blenheims prior to the outbreak of war. In February 1940, he transferred to No.600 Sqn. Shortly afterwards, he piloted one of six Blenheims tasked with attacking an airfield where Ju52 transport aircraft and their cargo of paratroops were reported to be landing during the Blitzkrieg on Holland. During this action he was shot down and crash landed, escaping back to Britain on the destroyer HMS Hereward, the destroyer which evacuated Queen Wilhelmina and her government. He was awarded the DFC for his actions over Holland that day. On his return to England, he flew night patrols on Blenheims, Defiants and Beaufighters, but rarely intercepted any aircraft due to poor radar. In January 1944 he took the post of Commanding Officer of No.488 Sqn flying Mosquitoes. With this squadron he flew beachhead patrols on D-Day, and had victories over two Ju88s. He was appointed to No.302 Sqn in the Pacific but had yet to arrive when the Japanese surrendered. He continued his career in the RAF until his retirement. Sadly, Richard Haine died on 30th September 2008


Squadron Leader Frank Joyce MBE

Click the name above to see prints signed by Squadron Leader Frank Joyce MBE
Squadron Leader Frank Joyce MBE

Originally flying Hurricanes with 87 Squadron, he was shot down in May 1940 during the Battle of France, was badly injured bailing out and lost his leg. After having a false leg fitted, he returned to active service duties with 286 Squadron, flying Defiants on coastal patrols.




Squadron Leader P G Leggett

Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by or with the mounted signature of Squadron Leader P G Leggett
Squadron Leader P G Leggett

Percival Graham Leggett was born on the 24th of February 1921 and joined the RAFVR In June 1939 as an Airman under training Pilot. He was called up for active duty on 1 September 1939 and he completed his training in September 1940. On the 18 September 1940 Leggett crashed at Oldbury on Severn in Gloucestershire but was unhurt. Leggett was posted to No.615 Squadron at RAF Prestick in Scotland then to 245 Squadron at RAF Aldergrove on 28 September and then to No.46 Squadron at RAF Stapleford on 18 October 1940. He claimed a Fiat BR.20 and probably destroyed and shared in the destruction of another on 11 November 1940. Leggett was then posted to No.145 Squadron in late November 1940 and then to No.96 Squadron on 18 December 1940. Flying his Hurricane off Ark Royal, Leggett joined 249 Squadron in Malta in June 1941 and was in action that same afternoon. In July he increased his Battle of Britain score by shooting down a Macchi C.200 but was shot down in December, bailing out with minor injuries. He was posted to the Desert Air Force just before El Alamein. An RAFVR pilot, Leggett had flown both Hurricanes and Defiants before his posting to Malta. He stayed on in the RAF commanding 73 Squadron on Vampires, retiring in 1958 as a Squadron Leader.



Flight Lieutenant Robin M M D Lucas

Click the name or photo above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant Robin M M D Lucas
Flight Lieutenant Robin M M D Lucas

Flight Lt Robin Lucas flew with 141 Squadron flying Boulton-Paul Defiants on night missions and flew Defiants during the Battle of Britain.



Flt. Lt. Michael Penny

Click the name above to see prints signed by Flt. Lt. Michael Penny
Flt. Lt. Michael Penny

His war service began in October 1940 at I.TW. Newquay. On completion of his training he was posted to No. 24 E. F.T.S. Luton. After 11 hours dual flying he first flew solo in a Miles Magister. After forty hours instruction he was posted to No. 9 S.F.T.S. Hullavington for advanced flying on Miles Masters and Hurricanes. On completing this course he was presented with his Wings, having now flown 62 hours. His next posting was to No. 60 O.T.U. at East Fortune where he converted to B & P Defiants. The Defiant was a very unpleasant aircraft to fly, very heavy and I did not like the idea of becoming a night fighter in this aircraft said Michael. He was then posted to No. 153 Squadron in Northern Ireland; after only a few days the Squadron was disbanded and he was given a chance to convert to Beaufighters or stay on 'singles'. Michael requested training for Spitfires but was informed that there were no vacancies at that moment in time. He then asked if he could fly Lysanders being used to tow drogues. His request was granted and he flew Lysanders until January 1943 when his posting came through to 58 O.T.U. Grangemouth. He completed 50 hours on Spitfires and was posted to 602 (City of Glasgow) Squadron 124 Airfield, Lasham. Michael recalls, Although we were operational, we were now in 2 nd T. A. F. and most of our flying was done in cooperation with the Army and Tank Cor. This involved continual very low flying and demanded very strict air flying discipline - this held me in good stead as time went on. In May 1943 the Squadron moved to 121 Airfield Fairlop where he flew his first operation over occupied Europe on a fighter sweep over Rouen, followed by an escort op. with Ventura bombers to Zeebruger; this was his first experience of enemy antiaircraft fire. Various escort and fighter sweeps followed. There followed a series of moves to various airfields in Sussex and Kent. In early 1944 the Squadron, then stationed at Ford, had bombs fitted to our aircraft for dropping on V1 launch sites. We began our dive at about 10,000 feet and released our bomb at 5000 feet - a most unpleasant experience. This brought us into range from all kinds of anti-aircraft fire, but fortunately we suffered very few direct hits, Michael recalls. After completing over 120 operations Michael was posted tour expired by the Air Comm. and went on to become a Spitfire flying instructor. He was demobilised in November 1945.


Flight Lieutenant F S Fred Stevens

Click the name above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant F S Fred Stevens
Flight Lieutenant F S Fred Stevens

After training in Australia and Canada, Fred Stevens found himself in October 1941 flying Bolton Paul Defiants, converting shortly after to Beaufighters, which he throughout 1942. In early 1943 he converted to the Mosquito Mk2 Night Fighter with A1 radar. This was with 456 Squadron (RAAF), they later re-equipped with the Mosquito Night Fighter Mk17. Before D-Day they transferred to Ford in West Sussex for the build up to the invasion, carrying out numerous operations. Later Fred and 456 were involved with attacking V1s at night.


Flight Lieutenant Tommy Taylor DFC MiD*

Click the name above to see prints signed by Flight Lieutenant Tommy Taylor DFC MiD*
Flight Lieutenant Tommy Taylor DFC MiD*

A Pilot with 9 and 467 Squadrons, Tommy completed two full tours on Lancasters flying from Bardney and Waddington. He finished the War flying Boulton and Paul Defiants on North Sea patrols in 1945.



J R Toombs

Click the name above to see prints signed by J R Toombs

11 / 12 / 2006Died : 11 / 12 / 2006
J R Toombs

John Richard Jack Toombs flew Blenheims during the Battle of Britain with No.236 Sqn, and also flew with No.264 Sqn and has also flown Defiants. Jack Toombs passed away on 11th December 2006.


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