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Stirling Aviation Art Gallery

Stirling

The Royal Air Force's first four engined monoplane Bomber, the Short Stirling first flew in May 1939 and entered front line service in August 1940 with no. 7 squadron. Due to its poor operational ceiling the aircraft sustained heavy losses and by mid 1942 the Stirling was beginning to be replaced by the Lancaster. Improved versions of the Short Stirling were built for Glider towing, paratroopers and heavy transport. also from 1943 many of the Stirling's were used for mine laying. A total of 2381 Stirling's were built for the Royal air Force and from this total 641 Stirling bombers were lost to enemy action. Crew 7 or 8: Speed: 260 mph (MK1) 275mph (MKIII) and 280mph (MKV)Service ceiling 17,000 feet Range: 2330 miles. (MK1) 2010 miles (MKIII) and 3,000 miles (MKV) Armament: two .303 Vickers machine guns. in nose turret, two .303 in browning machine guns in dorsal turret , Four .303 Browning machine guns in tail turret. Bomb Load 14,000 Lbs Engines: four 1150 Hp Bristol Hercules II (MK1) four 1650 hp Bristol Hercules XVI (MK111 and MKV)

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The Night Shift by Philip West.


The Night Shift by Philip West.

The Short Stirling was the RAFs first four-engined bomber to enter service and it served throughout WWII in many roles including bomber, minelayer, troop carrier and glider-tug. The lack of power produced by its engines severely limited the loads carried by Stirlings. On long-range trips such as Italy, even with a greatly reduced bomb load the aircraft could barely clear the Alps. Despite very large losses due to its operational limitations, those that flew this big, agile aircraft, came to respect and look upon it with it with affection.


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Item Code : DHM1670The Night Shift by Philip West. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 100 prints.
Full Item Details
Paper size 27 inches x 18 inches (69cm x 46cm) Livermore, R
+ Artist : Philip West


Signature(s) value alone : £20
£35 Off!
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £90.00

Quantity:
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs.
Full Item Details
Paper size 27 inches x 18 inches (69cm x 46cm) Goodman, L S Benny
Lucas, W E Bill
Livermore, R
+ Artist : Philip West


Signature(s) value alone : £65
£35 Off!
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EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed limited edition of 100 prints. (Two prints available.)
Full Item Details
Paper size 27 inches x 18 inches (69cm x 46cm) Livermore, R
+ Artist : Philip West


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Tugs of War (Stirling & Gliders) by Ivan Berryman.
for £140 -
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Tribute to the Crews of the Stirling by Graeme Lothian.
for £130 -
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Preparing To Go - Crew of a Short Stirling by Ivan Berryman.
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Stirlings of No.90 Squadron by Ivan Berryman.
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Stirlings Outward Bound by Robert Taylor.


Stirlings Outward Bound by Robert Taylor.

The Short Stirling was the RAFs first four-engined bomber but was handicapped by a low operational ceiling. Thus, Stirling crews spent much of their time flying through the flak rather than above flak. However, the Stirling possessed a strong, highly complex design that gained it a reputation as a pilots aircraft to fly; it was relatively agile for a big bomber. While flying the Stirling, Mahaddie had been attacked by a Ju88 nightfighter. After evading the attack, he managed to bring the aircraft home and subsequent inspection of the aircraft revealed 174 cannon shell holes. Mahaddie appropriately named that particular aircraft C for Colander. These Stirlings were part of No.7 Sqn RAF Pathfinders, based at RAF Oakington in Cambridgeshire throughout the war.


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Item Code : DHM2696Stirlings Outward Bound by Robert Taylor. - Editions Available
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PRINT Limited edition of 1500 prints, with no artist signature.
Full Item Details
Paper size 20 inches x 14 inches (51cm x 36cm) Mahaddie, Hamish

Signature(s) value alone : £70
£120.00

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Stirling Mine Laying by Keith Aspinall.


Stirling Mine Laying by Keith Aspinall.

Stirling Q-OJ of No.149 Sqn is shown minelaying in the Batlic. It was on precisely this type of mission - minelaying in the Baltic that aircraft W7639 (shown) was lost on 8th December 1942. Developing technical problems, the aircraft turned for home, but crashed in Suffolk, killing all seven crew on board. The crew were :
P/O J Philp BEM,
Sgt W S Hughes,
Sgt G E Hills,
Sgt C W Higgins,
Sgt F Craven,
Sgt T H Harris, and
Sgt T G Williams.


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Item Code : KA0023Stirling Mine Laying by Keith Aspinall. - Editions Available
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PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 14.5 inches x 9.5 inches (37cm x 24cm)none£5 Off!Now : £17.00

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PRINTThomson signature edition of less than 10 prints from the open edition.
Full Item Details
Image size 14.5 inches x 9.5 inches (37cm x 24cm) Thomson, George

Signature(s) value alone : £35
£5 Off!Now : £40.00

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Open edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 14.5 inches x 9.5 inches (37cm x 24cm)none
B.O.G.O.F.
Now : £22.00

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Tugs of War (Stirling & Gliders) by Ivan Berryman.


Tugs of War (Stirling & Gliders) by Ivan Berryman.

Wearing the distinctive black and white identification stripes of the D-Day operations of June 1944. Airspeed Horsa MkII assault gliders, towed by their Short Stirling MkIV tugs of No.620 Squadron, make their way across a moody English Channel en route for Normandy during the tumultuous Operation Overlord.


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Item Code : B0011Tugs of War (Stirling & Gliders) by Ivan Berryman. - Editions Available
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PRINT Limited edition of 250 prints, with crew signature.
Full Item Details
Image size 17 inches x 10 inches (43cm x 25cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£50 Off!
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Now : £70.00

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MacRobert's Reply by Ivan Berryman.
for £135 -
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The Night Shift by Philip West.
for £140 -
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Teamwork by Philip West.
for £140 -
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Teamwork by Philip West.


Teamwork by Philip West.

As night falls, Short Stirlings of XV Squadron based at Mildenhall, Cambridgeshire, await their crews for yet another nocturnal mission. One of the almost forgotten Bomber Command aircraft that made a very significant contribution to the war effort.


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Item Code : DHM2205Teamwork by Philip West. - Editions Available
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PRINTSigned limited edition of 300 prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 24 inches x 8 inches (61cm x 20cm) Austin, F H P
Ware, Geoffrey
Charlesworth, A R
+ Artist : Philip West


Signature(s) value alone : £40
£20 Off!
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PROOF
Limited edition of 25 artist proofs.
Full Item Details
Image size 24 inches x 8 inches (61cm x 20cm) Austin, F H P
Ware, Geoffrey
Charlesworth, A R
+ Artist : Philip West


Signature(s) value alone : £40
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Tugs of War (Stirling & Gliders) by Ivan Berryman.
for £140 -
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Tribute to the Crews of the Stirling by Graeme Lothian.
for £135 -
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Preparing To Go - Crew of a Short Stirling by Ivan Berryman.
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Stirlings of No.90 Squadron by Ivan Berryman.
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Stirling Work by Ivan Berryman.


Stirling Work by Ivan Berryman.

Tribute to the ground crew of Bomber Command. Ground crew inspect and prepare the engines of a Stirling bomber as it is refuelled in preparation for that nights mission.


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Item Code : B0376Stirling Work by Ivan Berryman. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 30 giclee art prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 16 inches x 10 inches (41cm x 25cm) Thomson, George
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


Signature(s) value alone : £35
£30 Off!
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Now : £85.00

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Limited edition of 20 artist proofs.
Full Item Details
Image size 16 inches x 10 inches (41cm x 25cm) Thomson, George
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


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£10 Off!
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Now : £110.00

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EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Limited edition of 30 giclee art prints. (One print reduced to clear)
Full Item Details
Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 21cm) Thomson, George
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


Signature(s) value alone : £35
Half
Price!
Now : £50.00

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Close Encounter by Iain Wyllie.


Close Encounter by Iain Wyllie.

On the 10th of June 1941 en route to Emden, Stirling MG-D of No.7 Sqn was intercepted by two Me-109s. The aircraft piloted by Flying Officer G B Blacklock DFM returned safely to base after shooting down one of the fighters.


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Item Code : IW0003Close Encounter by Iain Wyllie. - Editions Available
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PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 16.5 inches x 11.5 inches (42cm x 29cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£20.00

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PRINTBlacklock signature edition of 260 prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 16.5 inches x 11.5 inches (42cm x 29cm) Blacklock, Graham Baptie

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Stirling - The Heavy Brigade by Keith Woodcock.


Stirling - The Heavy Brigade by Keith Woodcock.

The Royal Air Force Short Stirling used by bomber command during World War Two. This aircraft carries the code AA-K of No.75 Squadron.


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Item Code : DHM2422Stirling - The Heavy Brigade by Keith Woodcock. - Editions Available
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 500 prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 12 inches x 6 inches (31cm x 15cm)Artist : Keith WoodcockAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£32.00

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PRINT Signed limited edition with extra aircrew signature.
Full Item Details
Image size 12 inches x 6 inches (31cm x 15cm) Boards, Douglas
+ Artist : Keith Woodcock


Signature(s) value alone : £15
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£42.00

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Outbound from Mildenhall by Ivan Berryman.


Outbound from Mildenhall by Ivan Berryman.

Short Stirling III EH990 is depicted heading out over the North Sea on the evening of 7th October 1943, on a mine-laying sortie off the Frisian Islands. LS-K was piloted, on this occasion, by Fl/Sg Thomas Robertson Ewen, RAFVR on his first - and sadly only - mission as pilot, his aircraft falling victim to a marauding enemy night fighter.


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Item Code : DHM6579Outbound from Mildenhall by Ivan Berryman. - Editions Available
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PRINTLimited edition of 30 giclee prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£10 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £95.00

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ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 20 artist proofs.
Full Item Details
Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£120.00

Quantity:
ARTIST
PROOF
Large Size Limited edition of 5 artist proofs.
Full Item Details
Image size 26 inches x 19.5 inches (66cm x 50cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£200.00

Quantity:
PRINTLarge Size Limited edition of 10 giclee prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 26 inches x 19.5 inches (66cm x 50cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£10 Off!Now : £150.00

Quantity:
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 10 giclee canvas prints.
Full Item Details
Size 30 inches x 22.5 inches (71cm x 57cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman
(on separate certificate)
£400.00

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ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original oil on canvas painting by Ivan Berryman.
Full Item Details
Size 24 inches x 18 inches (66cm x 50cm)Artist : Ivan BerrymanSOLD
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MacRobert's Reply by Ivan Berryman.


MacRobert's Reply by Ivan Berryman.

Short Stirling N6086 MacRobert's Reply of 15 Sqn is shown during the bombing raid on the French Harbour of Brest on 18th December 1941. British bombers had been dispatched to bomb the German battleships Gneisenau and Scharnhorst that were docked there, an action that earned N6086's skipper Fl Off Peter Boggis a DFC. Stirling W7428 is also shown with her port wing ablaze, one of two Stirlings lost on this operation. The subject of the RAF's attention can be seen amid the smoke - Gneisenau in drydock and Sharnhorst alongside.


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Item Code : B0459MacRobert's Reply by Ivan Berryman. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 30 giclee art prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 16 inches x 11 inches (41cm x 28cm) Thomson, George
Lamb, Alistair
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


Signature(s) value alone : £70
£30 Off!Now : £75.00

Quantity:
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 20 artist proofs.
Full Item Details
Image size 16 inches x 11 inches (41cm x 28cm) Thomson, George
Lamb, Alistair
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


Signature(s) value alone : £70
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£120.00

Quantity:
ARTIST
PROOF
Large Size Limited edition of 5 artist proofs.
Full Item Details
Image size 26 inches x 17 inches (66cm x 43cm)Artist : Ivan BerrymanAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£200.00

Quantity:
PRINTLarge Size Limited edition of 10 giclee art prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 26 inches x 17 inches (66cm x 43cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£10 Off!
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Now : £145.00

Quantity:
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 10 giclee canvas prints.
Full Item Details
Size 16 inches x 11 inches (41cm x 28cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman
(on separate certificate)
£70 Off!Now : £180.00

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ORIGINAL
ACRYLIC
Original acrylic painting by Ivan Berryman.
Full Item Details
Size 16 inches x 11 inches (41cm x 28cm)Artist : Ivan BerrymanSOLD
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Tugs of War (Stirling & Gliders) by Ivan Berryman.
for £135 -
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Tribute to the Crews of the Stirling by Graeme Lothian. (B)
for £180 -
Save £65


Stirlings by Keith Woodcock.


Stirlings by Keith Woodcock.

Flight crew prepare to get their Stirling ready for departure on another mission. This superb image is a fitting tribute to the Stirling bomber of Bomber Command and all the crews that flew in and also worked on this magnificent aircraft.


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Item Code : KW0005Stirlings by Keith Woodcock. - Editions Available
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PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 14.5 inches x 9.5 inches (37cm x 24cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£20.00

Quantity:
PRINTThomson signature edition of less than 10 prints from the open edition.
Full Item Details
Image size 14.5 inches x 9.5 inches (37cm x 24cm) Thomson, George

Signature(s) value alone : £35
£10 Off!Now : £50.00

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Preparing To Go - Crew of a Short Stirling by Ivan Berryman.


Preparing To Go - Crew of a Short Stirling by Ivan Berryman.

The crew of MkIII Short Stirling WP-M of No.90 Squadron RAF prepare for a flight test on the morning of 3rd July 1943.

Aircraft BK718, with designation WP-M, of No.90 Squadron RAF was lost over Germany in the early hours of 4th July 1943. Six of the seven crew were lost in the crash, the rear gunner surviving to be taken prisoner. Stirling WP-O was also lost on the same mission, with the loss of all seven crew.

The crew of Stirling WP-M, BK718: Sgt Hugh Murray, Flight Engineer - Sgt Robert Freeland, Air Bomber - P/O Geoffrey Smith, Air Gunner - Sgt Oliver Beard, Wireless Operator - P/O Andrew Gilmour, Navigator - F/Lt Robert Platt, Pilot - Sgt I. H. Norris, Air Gunner.


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Item Code : B0236Preparing To Go - Crew of a Short Stirling by Ivan Berryman. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 35 prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 22cm) Thomson, George
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


Signature(s) value alone : £35
£40 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £55.00

Quantity:
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 15 artist proofs.
Full Item Details
Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 22cm) Thomson, George
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


Signature(s) value alone : £35
£30 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £100.00

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ORIGINAL
DRAWING
Original pencil drawing by Ivan Berryman.
Full Item Details
Size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : Ivan BerrymanSOLD
OUT
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Buy With :
The Night Shift by Philip West.
for £125 -
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Buy With :
Teamwork by Philip West.
for £125 -
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Stirlings of No.90 Squadron by Ivan Berryman.
for £105 -
Save £65


Stirling - 1940s by Barry Price.


Stirling - 1940s by Barry Price.



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Item Code : NTR0066Stirling - 1940s by Barry Price. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£13.00

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Stirling Service by Philip West.


Stirling Service by Philip West.

The Short Stirling won the distinction as the RAFs first purpose built four engine monoplane bomber. A strong, highly complex design it gained a reputation as a pilots aircraft to fly being agile for a big bomber and demonstrating great character. Well over 2000 Stirlings provided stout service for the RAF in a variety of extremely important roles throughout WW2.


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Item Code : DHM2242Stirling Service by Philip West. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 175 prints.
Full Item Details
Paper size 28 inches x 20 inches (71cm x 51cm) Curtis, Lettice
Hill, J W
+ Artist : Philip West


Signature(s) value alone : £40
£50 Off!
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £90.00

Quantity:
ARTIST
PROOF
Limite dedition of 25 artist proofs.
Full Item Details
Paper size 28 inches x 20 inches (71cm x 51cm) Curtis, Lettice
Hill, J W
+ Artist : Philip West


Signature(s) value alone : £40
£20 Off!
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Now : £115.00

Quantity:
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed limited edition of 175 prints. (Three prints only available.)
Full Item Details
Paper size 28 inches x 20 inches (71cm x 51cm) Curtis, Lettice
Hill, J W
+ Artist : Philip West


Signature(s) value alone : £40
£30 Off!Now : £65.00

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Short Stirling MkI R9257 MG - C. by M A Kinnear.


Short Stirling MkI R9257 MG - C. by M A Kinnear.

Aircraft History: R9257 was one of a batch of 150 Mk I Stirlings delivered to the RAF by Short Brothers between January 1942 and January 1943. Initially with Telecommunications Flying Unit, R9257 went to No.7 Squadron, where it eventually became the personal aircraft of Hamish Mahaddie and his crew from 8th February 1943 until he completed his operational tour with the PFF (Path Finder Force) at the end of March 1943. The aircraft then went on to No.1657 Heavy Conversion Unit at Stradishall, before being sent to No.214 Squadron. On 12th August 1943, whilst leaving RAF Chedburgh for a raid against Turin, R9257 swung on take off and the undercarriage collapsed. The aircraft was categorised as damaged beyond repair (DBR). R9257 replaced Hamish and his crews earlier Stirling MK I, R9273 also MG- C which had been attacked six days earlier by a Ju88 nightfighter. After evading the attack, they managed to bring the aircraft home. Next morning, Hamish counted 174 cannon shell holes in the ai.........


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Item Code : AP0017Short Stirling MkI R9257 MG - C. by M A Kinnear. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 16.5 inches x 11.5 inches (42cm x 30cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00

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Guardian Moon by Ivan Berryman.


Guardian Moon by Ivan Berryman.

Bomb doors open and ready for the vital drop, Short Stirling III EH990 prepares to lay her deadly cargo of mines off the coast of the Frisian Islands on the night of 7th October 1943. LS-K failed to return from the perilous mission, the aircraft believed to have been the victim of a German night fighter.


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Item Code : DHM6531Guardian Moon by Ivan Berryman. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 30 giclee prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£20 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £95.00

Quantity:
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 20 artist proofs.
Full Item Details
Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£20 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £120.00

Quantity:
ARTIST
PROOF
Large Size Limited edition of 5 artist proofs.
Full Item Details
Image size 26 inches x 19.5 inches (66cm x 50cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£200.00

Quantity:
PRINTLarge Size Limited edition of 10 giclee prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 26 inches x 19.5 inches (66cm x 50cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£10 Off!Now : £150.00

Quantity:
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 10 giclee canvas prints.
Full Item Details
Size 30 inches x 22.5 inches (71cm x 57cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman
(on separate certificate)
£400.00

Quantity:
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original oil on canvas painting by Ivan Berryman.
Full Item Details
Size 24 inches x 18 inches (66cm x 50cm)Artist : Ivan BerrymanSOLD
OUT
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Tribute to the Crews of the Stirling by Graeme Lothian.


Tribute to the Crews of the Stirling by Graeme Lothian.

Outward bound, Stirling III of 199 Squadron based at Lakenheath, Suffolk, heads out on another night of operations in August 1943. EE953, Sqd letters EX - E of 100 group is piloted by F/L Tom Austin DFC who finished his tour by the end of October 1944, winning the DFC with his bomb aimer F/O Jack Lawrence. Nicknamed the Queen of the Skies, the Stirling was the 1st four engined bomber to enter service with the RAF in 1941. The cockpit stood a massive 22.5 feet from the ground and had an operational ceiling of only 12,000 feet, well within the range of the enemy AA guns. By September 1944 other bombers were taking the brunt of the attack to the Germans and the Stirlings were used mainly for glider towing especially for D-day and Arnhem.


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Item Code : DHM1326Tribute to the Crews of the Stirling by Graeme Lothian. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 1150 prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 25 inches x 15 inches (64cm x 38cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian£50 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £90.00

Quantity:
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs.
Full Item Details
Image size 25 inches x 15 inches (64cm x 38cm) Austin, Tom
+ Artist : Graeme Lothian


Signature(s) value alone : £20
£20 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £145.00

Quantity:
PRINTLimited edition of 150 signed prints, from the limited edition of 1150.
Full Item Details
Image size 25 inches x 15 inches (64cm x 38cm) Austin, Tom
+ Artist : Graeme Lothian


Signature(s) value alone : £20
£15 Off!
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Now : £125.00

Quantity:
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian
(on separate certificate)
Half
Price!
Now : £300.00

Quantity:
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints.
Full Item Details
Image size 30 inches x 18 inches (76cm x 46cm)Artist : Graeme Lothian
(on separate certificate)
Half
Price!
Now : £250.00

Quantity:
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Graeme Lothian.
Full Item Details
Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Graeme LothianHalf
Price!
£1600 Off!
Now : £1600.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
The Night Shift by Philip West.
for £130 -
Save £135

Buy With :
Teamwork by Philip West.
for £135 -
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Stirlings of No.90 Squadron by Ivan Berryman.


Stirlings of No.90 Squadron by Ivan Berryman.

The Short Stirlings WP-M and WP-O, aircraft numbers BK718 and EH907, fly together en route to Cologne in the late evening of 3rd July 1943.

Aircraft BK718, with designation WP-M, of No.90 Squadron RAF was lost over Germany in the early hours of 4th July 1943. Six of the seven crew were lost in the crash, the rear gunner surviving to be taken prisoner. Stirling WP-O was also lost on the same mission, with the loss of all seven crew.

The crew of Stirling WP-M, BK718: Sgt Hugh Murray, Flight Engineer - Sgt Robert Freeland, Air Bomber - P/O Geoffrey Smith, Air Gunner - Sgt Oliver Beard, Wireless Operator - P/O Andrew Gilmour, Navigator - F/Lt Robert Platt, Pilot - Sgt I. H. Norris, Air Gunner.


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Item Code : B0237Stirlings of No.90 Squadron by Ivan Berryman. - Editions Available
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Original pencil drawing by Ivan Berryman.
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Preparing To Go - Crew of a Short Stirling by Ivan Berryman.
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McRoberts Reply by Geoff Lea.


McRoberts Reply by Geoff Lea.

MacRobert's Reply was the name given to a Short Stirling bomber of No 15 Squadron, serial N6086. The Stirling was paid the donation of 25,000 pounds by Lady MacRobert in commemoration of her three sons, all of whom were killed whilst serving with the RAF. The eldest son Alasdair died in a flying accident in 1938, whilst Roderick and Iain were both killed in action during 1941. On October 1941 MacRobert's Reply was handed over to No.15 Squadron at RAF Wyton, with Lady MacRobert attending the naming ceremony. The Stirling had the MacRobert coat of arms painted on the nose, and the code LS-F. The Stirling flew twelve missions between October 1941 and January 1942, before accidentally swinging on take off and colliding with a damaged Spitfire at RAF Peterhead on 7th February 1942. The aircraft was written off.


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Item Code : DHM0921McRoberts Reply by Geoff Lea. - Editions Available
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Stirlings Ready by Keith Woodcock.


Stirlings Ready by Keith Woodcock.

Stirling bombers of 7th Squadron Bomber Command of the Royal Air Force made ready for their next mission by the squadron's ground crew. A fitting tribute to all the ground crews of Bomber Command.


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Item Code : KW0011Stirlings Ready by Keith Woodcock. - Editions Available
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Signatures for : Stirling
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo


Wg. Cdr. F H P Austin OBE RAF
Wg. Cdr. F H P Austin OBE RAF

Joined the RAF in September 1932 as an aircraft apprentice. After three years at Cranwell he was posted to No16 (AC) Squadron and trained as an Air Gunner. In 1937, he joined No. 36 (TB) Squadron in Singapore and in January 1939 he returned to the UK for training as an Air Observer. He was promoted to Sergeant and joined 149 (B) Squadron at Mildenhall. He flew his first operational sortie on 4th September 1939 (Kiel Canal) and continued operating with the squadron until his captain (Wg. Cdr. P. I. Harris DFC) was selected to command No7 Squadron. After aircraft familiarisation on Stirling aircraft he arrived at Oakington in October 1940. Now commissioned he was a crew member on the very first Stirling Operation on 10th February 1941, targeting oil tanks at Rotterdam. In September 1941, he was selected for Specialist Armament training, followed by spells as Chief Armament Instructor at Moreton-in-Marsh and Wellesbourne Mountford. Posted to Air Headquarters in India, in September 1945 and subsequently moved to the RAF Staff College in Haifa in 1946. After a flying refresher course he served with the Bomber Command Development Unit at Marham until 1948. After an exchange posting with RAAF HQ Melbourne he returned to the UK in January 1954 on promotion to Wg. Cdr. (Admin) at RAF Kinloss. His final posting was to the Supreme HQ Allied Powers Europe in 1959, retiring in 1965.

Flight Lieutenant Tom Austin DFC AE
Flight Lieutenant Tom Austin DFC AE

After joining the RAF in 1941 Tom Austin qualified as a pilot on Harvards, then converted into Halifaxs. During the war years other aircraft he flew included Wellingtons, Stirlings and Lancasters. While flying Wellingtons as part of 199 Squadron during a raid over Dortmund, his aircraft was badly damaged but Tom managed to limp home, crash landing at Mildenhall.

The Lord Mackie of Benshie CBE DSO DFC
The Lord Mackie of Benshie CBE DSO DFC

George Mackie joined the RAF in February 1940, training as a Navigator in Bomber Command. He first joined 15 Squadron in 1941 flying Wellingtons, before going to the Middle East to join 148 Squadron. He later served with 149 Squadron on Stirlings, and 115 Squadron on Lancasters. Squadron Leader George Mackie completed three full tours on heavies, the last two as aircraft Captain.

Flight Lieutenant George Britton
Flight Lieutenant George Britton

Joining the RAF in 1941, George trained on Wellington and Stirlings as a Wireless Operator and Air Gunner. Converting to Lancasters he was posted to 90 Squadron for his first operational tour, and then to 186 Squadron, still on Lancasters. George then found himself designated to be an Intelligence Officer at Lossiemouth, interrogating Italian POWs Finally, before leaving the service in 1946, he served in Sunderland flying boats, flying to West Africa, Europe and Scandinavia.

Warrant Officer Ron Brown
Warrant Officer Ron Brown

Initially served as a Fitter on Hurricanes and Harvards, then joined Aircrew in 1942 and served as a Flight Engineer on Stirlings with 218 Squadron where he towed gliders on D-Day. He went on to complete another Tour with 75 Squadron on Lancasters, completing 64 Operations by the end of the War.


Air Commodore Wilf Burnett DSO OBE DFC AFC

26 / 11 / 2006Died : 26 / 11 / 2006
Air Commodore Wilf Burnett DSO OBE DFC AFC

Canadian Wilf Burnett joined the RAF before the war and at the outbreak of hostilities was flying Hampdens. He completed his first tour of 30 operations in September 1940, flying with 49 Sqn at Scampton. His crew had bombed invasion barges in the Channel ports, mined enemy waters, operated against the Ruhr, and taken part in the first raids against Berlin. In July 1941 he was posted to 408 (Goose) Sqn RCAF, at Syerston, where one night in January 1942, returning from Hamburg, their Hampden crashed in extreme weather. Wilf was the sole survivor, and he was hospitalised. Recovering he was accepted to command 138 (Special Duties) Sqn at Tempsford who were engaged in dropping agents and supplies to the Resistance in occupied countries flying Halifaxes, later Stirlings. He died 26th November 2006.

Warrant Officer William Jock Burnett
Warrant Officer William Jock Burnett

Jock Burnett (Flight Engineer) volunteered at the age of 18 as a Direct Entry in Edinburgh F/E and served in the RAFVR from 25th May 1943 until 19th February 1947 following a F/E course at St Athans, South Wales. On passing out from this course Jock was posted to Swinderby on Stirlings heavy conversion unit 1660 before being transferred to Syerston and Lancasters. In early August 1944 Jock joined 617 Sqn at Woodhall Spa and was subsequently posted with the squadron to Waddington and Digri, India. He completed 30 missions, all with Lawrence Benny Goodman as the pilot. Notable raids Jock took part in were on the Tirpitz, 29th October 1944, dropping the Grand Slam 22,000 bomb on the Arnsberg Viaduct, 19th March 1945, and the attack on Berchtesgarten Eagles Nest, 25th May 1945.


A R Charlesworth
A R Charlesworth

Volunteered at the age of 18 in 1942 and trained as a pilot in Canada. On returning to England in spring of 1942, he trained on Whitley Bombers and converted to Stirlings in January 1945. He took part in the Rhine Crossing towing a Horsa glider, which was his last operation. He joined 299 Sqdn at Shepherds Gove in April 1945 and was heavily engaged in towing gliders (Horsas) and supply drop training. Before the end of the European was, he flew Stirling [Vs supplying our advancing armies through Europe and completed one operational supply drop to Denmark underground forces. He left the RAF in 1947.

Flight Lieutenant Gordon Clark DFM
Flight Lieutenant Gordon Clark DFM

Initially served in the Army, but transferred to RAF pilot training crashing his Tiger Moth on his first solo flight! He transferred to become a Bomb Aimer on Stirlings with 149 Sqn at Lakenheath, completing 28 ops with Bomber Command.

Warrant Officer James Coman DFC
Warrant Officer James Coman DFC

As a WOP/Air Gunner he flew with both 149 and 90 Squadrons on Wellingtons, Stirlings and Lancasters completing 52 Ops including one of the first raids on Berlin made in a Wellington.

Miss Lettice Curtis
Miss Lettice Curtis

Joined the Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) in July 1940 having been taken on to ferry Tiger Moths. Although we were later allowed to ferry other training types such as Oxfords and Masters, it was not until the autumn of 1941 that women were allowed to fly operational aircraft types. I flew my first Hurricane in August 1941 and my first Spitfire a couple of weeks later. After a brief course on a Blenheim I was cleared to fly without any further training, twin-engine bombers up to the Wellington. In November 1943 I was sent on a Halifax course, which due to unserviceability and bad weather closed, restarting in February 1943 at Pocklington where I was cleared for ferrying Halifaxes. After that without further training, I ferried Lancasters and over 100 Stirlings. In November 1945 I ferried 14 Liberators.

Flight Lieutenant Frank Diamond DFC AE

9 / 2007Died : 9 / 2007
Flight Lieutenant Frank Diamond DFC AE

At the outbreak of war Frank was serving with the Territorial Army, transferring to the RAF in May 1941 and training as a navigator on flying Boats. In 1943 he completed a full tour on Stirlings, and in 1944 joined the Pathfinder Force as a navigator on Mosquitos with 571 Squadron, Light Night Strike Force. At the end of the war he joined Transport Command returning the wounded from Europe. Frank Diamond passed away in September 2007.


Squadron Leader L S Benny Goodman
Squadron Leader L S Benny Goodman

Benny Goodman (Pilot) volunteered for aircrew at 18 years of age and was called up in 1940. After basic training he went to RAF Abingdon - a Whitley OTU - for what he was told would be straight through training. This did not materialise and he found himself in the role of a Ground Gunner. In 1941, a posting eventually came through to the Initial Training Wing followed by Elementary Fyling School at Peterborough and an instructors course at Woodley, Reading; then to Clyffe Pyparde, a holding unit. A sea journey to Canada followed and Service Flying Training School on Ansons. On completion he was posted to Kingston, Ontario, to instruct Acting Leading Naval Airmen on the Royal Navy tactics of the time, e.g. jinking after take off, dive bombing, etc. Eventually he returned to the UK and OTU on Wellingtons at Silverstone and Heavy Conversion Bomber Unit at Swinderby on Stirlings, followed by a short course at the Lancaster Conversion Unit. After an interview Benny and his crew were surprised and delighted to find they had been selected for 617 squadron - this was in 1944 and they had stayed together as a crew on 617 squadron until the war in Europe ended. He completed 30 missions - all with Jock Burnett as his flight engineer. Notable raids Jock took part in were on the Tirpitz, 29th October 1944, dropping the Grand Slam 22,000 bomb on the Arnsberg Viaduct, 19th March 1945, and the attack on Berchtesgarten Eagles Nest, 25th May 1945.

Warrant Officer Richard Basher Hearne
Warrant Officer Richard Basher Hearne

Basher Hearne joined the RAF in 1942 and trained as a Flight Engineer. His first operational posting was to 622 Squadron at Mildenhall in Suffolk, equipped with Stirlings, and then, in November 1943, he transferred to 15 Squadron, also flying from the same base. The squadron re-equipped with Lancasters the following month.

W/O J W Hill
W/O J W Hill

Joined 196 Squadron on his 18th birthday, 25th November 1939, having cycled ten miles to the nearest recruiting office, hoping to enlist as an air gunner. However there were no vacancies and they eventually contacted him to suggest becoming a ground gunner. After square bashing on Blackpool promenade, he found himself guarding West Raynham aerodrome in Norfolk, where they were regularly strafed by German aeroplanes, flying extremely low. He then decided he would like to get his own back and volunteered for aircrew, this time as a pilot. After ACRC, Lords cricket ground, then ITW Scarborough, he found himself crossing the Atlantic in a convoy. There were numerous ships, containing budding aircrews, evacuated children and Italian prisoners of war. The fact that he had to sling his hammock at the very front of the ship, below the waterline, did nothing to boost his confidence, but they did have a number of destroyers for protection. Eventually, they docked at New York and then trans-shipped by rail to Moncton, New Brunswick, the holding terminal. His first experience of flying was at 32 EFTS Bowden, Alberta, where he flew Stearmans. He then moved on to Weyburn, Saskatchewan, where he obtained his wings, flying Harvards. Then it was back to England, this time travelling solo on a fast liner. He flew Tiger Moths at Banff, Scotland, then moved to twin-engine Oxfords, followed by Wellingtons. This was where he crewed up he did one bombing raid on Wellingtons. Next he moved to 1665 Heavy Conversion Unit at Woolfox Lodge, flying Stirlings, then joined 196 Squadron on 5th November 1943. At the time of joining the Squadron, Stirlings were taken off bombing, and joined 38 group, assisting glider pilots with circuits and bumps, interspersed with operations to France, dropping supplies to the maquis. These trips were done at low level on moonlit nights, the theory being that they would be too low for both fighters and ground gunners to get at them. The biggest problem seemed to be avoiding high ground. On the night of 5th June, D-Day minus one, he dropped paratroopers near Caen, close to the now famous Pegasus Bridge. Then on D-Day itself, he towed a heavy Horsa glider to the Caen beachhead. During June he dropped more containers in the area. In September he made various trips to Arnhem. On one trip, due to fog over the North Sea, his glider became detached, finishing up in the sea. Luckily he later learnt the occupants were picked up by Air-Sea Rescue. These trips were done at a very low level, making them sitting ducks for the ground gunners. Aircraft losses were very severe: on one day, less than half the squadron got back to base, although some put down at other aerodromes. On one day, in addition to the gunners, there were German fighters overhead. He would have to take the decision to dive to the deck, lifting over the high-tension cables; the aeroplane escaped relatively lightly, with not much damage. He left the Squadron on completion of his tour in 38 group, on 6th June 1945. He then went back to 1665 HCU, this time as an instructor. Apart from a course on Oxfords at 7 FIS, he finished flying on 25th September 1945 and was demobbed on 27th March 1946, having completed a total of 1,021 hours flying.

Gunnery Leader Sgt Alistair Lamb
Gunnery Leader Sgt Alistair Lamb

Alistair Lamb, born in Stirling, Scotland, joined the Royal Air Force in March 1944 and went to No.7 Gunnery School at Stormydown in Wales. In August 1944 he went to Market Harborough and started training in Ansons before moving on to Wellingtons. Alistair went to H1654 heavy conversion unit at Wigsley flying in Stirlings and Lancasters. In March he joined No.15 Squadron at Mildenhall and participated in amongst other operations Operation Manna dropping food supplies to the Dutch, on the 30th April 1945 over Rotterdam, 2nd May 1945 over The Hague and 7th May 1945 at Valkenburg. Sgt Alistair lamb and the rest of the crew also took part in Operation Harken Project, photography of U-Boat Pens at Farge. After the war Sgt Alistair Lamb stayed with 15 Squadron at RAF Wyton on Lincolns until August 1947 when he left the RAF and joined the Civil Service. Alistair Lamb still lives in his home town of Stirling.

Squadron Leader Reg Lewis DFC
Squadron Leader Reg Lewis DFC

Reg Lewis was a navigator in Bomber Command, first with XV Squadron, and then 214 Squadron, both on Stirlings. In August 1943 he was posted to 138 (Special Duties) Squadron based at Tempsford. Here he flew Halifaxes, dropping agents and arms into occupied Europe. In February 1944, after flying agent Francis Cammaerts over France, Reg was shot down but evaded capture and made his way to and over the Pyrenees into Spain, and home.


Flt Lt R Livermore
Flt Lt R Livermore

Was part of 299 Air Support Squadron in Norfolk. He flew six ops. on Stirlings, taking supplies to the French resistance - dropping 24 containers at a time by parachute at night, each one full of supplies, including guns and ammunition. They had to arrive at the target area within a five minute period, or else the resistance would leave for fear of a trap being set by the Germans. When the resistance were satisfied they were watching the correct aircraft they would flash they torches on and off as both a signal and also to pinpoint the drop zone. Flt. Lt. Livermore also towed gliders behind his Stirling aircraft during the Rhine crossing.


Sqn Ldr W E Bill Lucas DFC
Sqn Ldr W E Bill Lucas DFC

Born in 1917, Bill Lucas volunteered for aircrew early in 1940 and after training as a fighter pilot he became, due to the high demand, a bomber pilot and joined 9 Squadron (Wellingtons) in August 1941. After 14 missions over Germany Bill converted to Stirlings and completed a further 26 operations, this time with 15 Squadron at Wyton. After two years instructing at 19 OTU Kinloss he was selected to join Pathfinder Force in October 1944 to fly Mosquitoes with 162 Squadron at Bourn, Cambridgeshire, where he remained until war end to complete 41 more missions making 81 in total. Bill attained the rank of Squadron Leader and was awarded the DFC and a Mention in Despatches. The most memorable of his missions must be the first 1000 bomber raid on Cologne on May 30 1942, as this seems to have struck a lasting memory in the minds of the general public. After the war Bill pursued a career in the insurance industry and also began to pick up the pieces of a serious athletic activity with the Belgrave Harriers which resulted in selection for the 5000 metres at the Olympic Games at Wembley in 1948, but at the age of 32 he was not in his own words very successful. Bill says his greatest regret was missing the games in Helsinki in 1940 and the cancelled games in 1944. These should have been the best athletic years of my life.


Group Captain Hamish Mahaddie DSO DFC

16 / 1 / 1997Died : 16 / 1 / 1997
Group Captain Hamish Mahaddie DSO DFC

Group Captain Thomas Gilbert Hamish Mahaddie. DSO, DFC, AFC.. CzMC. Nos 7, 55, and 77 Squadrons. Born In Keith, Edinburgh, on 19 March 1911. He joined the RAF as a part of the 17th Entry at Halton in 1928 and trained as a metal rigger, after which he was posted to Cranwell on ground servicing duties. In 1933 he boarded a troopship bound for the Middle East where he joined No 4 FTS at Abu Suler for pilot training. He gained his wings in 1935 and his first air crew posting was to No 55 Squadron at Hinaldi flying Westland Wapitis. On his return to England in 1937 he joined No 77 Squadron flying Whitleys from Driffield. During World War II he completed a tour of operations with No 77 Squadron before moving to Klnloss to instruct with No 14 OTU. He completed another tour, this time with No 7 Squadron at Oakington on Stirlings, before joining HQ Staff of No 8 (Pathfinder) Group. Group Captain Mahaddie finished the war as Station Commander at RAF Warboys, home of PFF Navigation Training Unit. In June 1945 he was appointed to command No 111 Wing in Germany followed by a spell at the Staff College, Haifa, In 1947. His postwar duties also included two tours of duty at the Air Ministry, as OC Flying Wing at Binbrook, and also as Station Commander at Sylt and Butzwellerhof in Germany. He finally retired from the RAF in 1958 and has since been involved with the film Industry as an aviation consultant specialising in electronics for all three services. Hamish Mahaddie died 16th January 1997.


Group Captain Roy D Max

1 / 7 / 2007Died : 1 / 7 / 2007
Group Captain Roy D Max

Group Captain Roy Max, who has died aged 88, Roy Max was born on November 24 1918 at Brightwater, near Nelson in New Zealand. After attending Nelson College he learned to fly at the local aero club when he was 18. travelled from New Zealand to join the RAF and received a short servcie commission in August 1938 as a pilot and survived the crippling losses of bombers deployed to France at the outbreak of the Second World War; already a veteran at 24, he was made a wing commander and appointed to command No 75 (NZ) Squadron, the first Commonwealth squadron in Bomber Command. Shortly after the declaration of war in September 1939 No 103 Squadron, equipped with the Fairey Battle, deployed to France. in May 1940 along with the other 9 Fairy Battle squadorns. took part in action against the german Offensive But the Fairy battles were outclassed by the german fighters. On one occassion a force of 70 fairey Battle aircraft took part in a bombingmission on bridges at sedan a total of 41 aircraft were lost., Captain Roy Max dived on a group of enemy tanks in a valley and found that the guns were shooting down on him. His aircraft was hit and unable to climb. Although he and his gunner were wounded, he managed to land on a French airfield. Returning to operations a few days later, he was told that he had been awarded the Croix de Guerre and the news reached his parents and newspapers in New Zealand. In the chaos of the collapsing French administration, however, the paperwork was lost and he never received the medal. By the middle of June No 103 had lost 18 aircraft and nine crews, and Max was lucky to survive when a German fighter strafed the airfield as he was standing on the wing refuelling his aircraft. He jumped into a trench and watched his bomber burst into flames with all his belongings inside it. In the sole surviving aircraft he took off for a maintenance unit near Nantes, where a number of other Battles were found. Ground crew were loaded into the cramped cockpit of Max's aircraft and he headed towards England. He navigated using a map torn from a calendar, skirting the Channel Islands and landing at the first airfield he came to after crossing the English coast in order to determine where he was; he then pressed on to Abingdon. Roy Max his squadorn but now 103 squadron was now equipped with Wellington bombers, and Max flew on the squadron's first operation bombing the docks at Ostend in December 1940. Roy Max also attacked targets in the Ruhr. in March 1941 Roy Max spent some time ferrying Amercina built Hudson bombers form the Us to England, after this he re joined 103 squadron. On July 24th 1941 a 100 boomber day light raid took place against the german naval ships at Brest, Roy Max was leading a section of Wellingtons with no fighter escort, and losses were heavy. But he pressed home his attack, and his bombs were seen exploding on a dry dock. He was awarded the DFC. In July 1943 Max's short service commission was completed, and he reverted to the RNZAF as a squadron leader. Almost immediately he was informed that it had been decided that a native New Zealander should command No 75 (NZ) Squadron and he was promoted to wing commander. Max began operations on August 19 1943, flying the Stirling bomber from an airfield near Cambridge. The Battle of Berlin was under way and the Stirling, unable to climb to the higher levels of the Lancaster and Halifax, suffered heavy losses. Roy Max as the squadorn Commnader flew operations with his crew but, was not expected to fly on every sortie. The Stirling was eventually withdrawn from long-range bombing operations, and Max and his crews flew mining sorties and parachute drops to resistance groups. After converting to the Lancaster and flying a few more operations in support of the impending D-Day landings, his tour ended in May 1944, when he was awarded the DSO, an award that he always claimed belonged to his air and ground crews. Max returned to New Zealand to command a flying training airfield near Christchurch. In 1947 he accepted a permanent commission in the RAF, returning to England as a flight lieutenant. Having attended a course at the RAF Flying College he commanded the bomber squadron at the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment at Boscombe Down, where the new jet bombers for the RAF were being tested. After commands in Germany and Italy and other Air ministry Jobs, in 1965 he became ADC to the Queen and finally retiring form the RAF in November 1968. Sadly on the 1st July 2007 Roy Max passed away.

Flg Off Jim Pinning
Flg Off Jim Pinning

volunteered and was called up for Air Crew duties in April 1942. After some Pilot training in S Rhodesia and returning to England, Jim qualified as a Flight Engineer, joining Flying Officer David Coster and crew at Conversion Unit flying Stirlings. After a course at Lancaster Finishing School, a posting to IX Squadron, Bardney resulted. On his seventh trip Jim flew in WS.T LM448 (as illustrated in Preparing for the Tirpitz) on the final Tirpitz raid, but as the result of heavy flak damage causing a loss of fuel and power a course was set for Sweden where, after evading enemy fighters over Norway, a crash landing was made. After returning to England the crew re-joined the Squadron and Jim completed 22 ops. by the end of the war. After cancellation of the Tiger Force destined for the Far East, Jim joined Squadron Leader (Jock) Blair for the Squadrons brief visit to India.

Flight Sergeant Gerald Prettejohns
Flight Sergeant Gerald Prettejohns

Joining the RAF in 1943, he flew as a Flight Engineer serving with 106 Sqn before moving to 9 Sqn. He completed a full tour on Stirlings and Lancasters including raids against the Tirpitz.

F/O Tom Sawyer
F/O Tom Sawyer

Flew Whitleys with 10 Sqn from Leeming and then Halifaxes with 102 Sqn from Driffield - he completed 35 Operations, and then moved on to training aircrew on Stirlings towing gliders.

Warrant Officer Don Say DFC
Warrant Officer Don Say DFC

Joined the RAFVR in March 1939 and was sent for Aircrew training to Calgary and Hamilton in Canada in 1941. He qualified as Observer (armaments) aimer and served first on Vickers Wellingtons with 466 Sqdn (Aus) completing 20 operations before moving on to 196 Sqn for a further ten operations over France and Germany on Stirlings. After six months as Instructor, his second tour of 23 operations in Lancasters was with 514 Sqn. The picture evoked memories of a daylight operation on oil refineries at Bordeaux on 4th August 1944. Crossing the Cornish coast on return at very low level, everyone reported nude sunbathers running for cover, as 300 Lancasters roared overhead. His total war service was six and a half years between 1939 and 1945, completing two operational tours. He was awarded the DFC in 1944.

Flight Sergeant Ray Swift
Flight Sergeant Ray Swift

Upon completing his training as a WOP/Air Gunner he was posted to 138 Sqn with whom he completed 46 Ops on Stirlings before transferring to Lancasters with 218 Sqn.

Flt Lt Ken Thomas DFC
Flt Lt Ken Thomas DFC

Originally joined the RAF as a mechanic, but went on to complete his pilot's course. Ken completed 30 Operations flying Stirlings and Lancasters for 622 Sqn at Mildenhall.

Sgt George B Thomson
Sgt George B Thomson

George Thomson was trained on Stirlings and Wellingtons before converting to Lancasters and joining No.15 Sqn. He flew most of his missions on Lancaster LS-P, including missions to Stettin and Paris rail yards. While on the Paris mission, LS-M developed engine problems and was left behind by the rest of the squadron. Luckily, two P-38 Lightnings high above spotted the the struggling Lancaster and came down to escort the bomber back to base at Mildenhall. On the night of 12th September 1944, George was Navigator on Lancaster NF958 (LS-M) of No.15 Sqn, his usual aircraft LS-P grounded with engine trouble. This was to be his first and last mission on this aircraft as it was lost in the skies above Mannheim when it was attacked by the Messerschmitt Bf.110G-2 of Ofw Ludwig Schmidt of II/NGJ 6. Five of the seven crew of the aircraft, including George, managed to escape from the burning aircraft but two did not manage to escape the inferno. The aircraft came down in the vicinity of the railway station in Wieblingen, south of Mannheim. Having escaped the aircraft, he did not however manage to evade the enemy, and he was taken into captivity until the end of the war.First Op : I suppose all aircrew looked forward to their first operational flight with some trepidation, but in my own case I didn't have time to think about it, as this tale will tell. Having completed my navigation training I moved on to No. 11 O.T.U at Westcott, in December 1943, flying in Wellingtons and where I crewed up; from there it was on to 1657 Conversion Unit at Stradishall, where we flew Stirlings, then to NO.3 L.F.S. at Feltwell where we converted to Lancasters. Three rounds of circuits and bumps and one 'Bullseye' and then posted to Mildenhall in June 1944 to join XV Squadron. Arriving at Mildenhall, on my first day I reported to the Navigation Office. The Navigation Leader, F/Lt. Jack Fabian, a New Zealander, greeted me warmly enough, but was somewhat perplexed by the fact that he had another Scottish Navigator to deal with. As he said, there were already Scots known as 'Jock', 'Haggis', and 'Bagpipes', so henceforth he would call me 'Tommy'. As I was leaving his Office, he threw a fastball at me - 'Would I like to do an Op that night with a crew whose navigator had gone sick?' I was somewhat nonplussed and replied to the effect that I would have preferred to do my first Op with my own crew. To my surprise he simply said - 'That's O.K. Tommy, there will be plenty opportunities later on. 'Four days later we did a loaded climb and for some reason or another thought that we would perhaps do one or two more exercises before seeing our names on the Battle Order. Next day there seemed to be nothing on so we went our individual ways, with the Flight Engineer and myself deciding that we would go to the Camp Cinema that night. We were settled in our seats, and the big movie had just started - 'The Picture of Dorian Grey' - when a message flashed up on the screen for Sgts Howarth and Thomson to report to the Briefing Room immediately. We hurriedly left the Cinema and made our way to the Briefing Room, wondering what this was all about, when we met the aircrews coming out and getting aboard transport to be taken to their aircraft. Jack Fabian was at the door, and he handed me a Navigations Bag with the comment - You'll fmd everything in there; just follow the plane in front until you get sorted out.' We got transported out to the aircraft where the other members of the crew were already aboard, and I was still unpacking my bag as we trundled to the runway, taking off at 22.57. By the time we were in the air I had unfolded the chart and found where the target was - a 'P' Plane site at L Hey - the route there and back had already been plotted so, in effect, I was being spoon fed for my first Op.

We encountered slight flak on route and were attacked by a Ju88 over the target, forcing the Bomb Aimer to ask the Pilot to go round again. On the second run in to the target another aircraft crossed our path, again forcing a re-run as before, but eventually having unloaded our bombs we headed back home, landing at base two and a half hours after take-off. To my surprise neither I nor the Flight Engineer were challenged as to why we had been at the Cinema, nor did we get a satisfactory explanation from the other crew members as to why they had not made contact with us after seeing the Battle Order for that night.

Four nights later we were on our second Op to another 'P' Plane site, encountering three attacks by Me110s, one of which was damaged by our Rear Gunner. From then on, we never met another fighter until our twentieth Op on 12th September 1944, when we were attacked twice as we turned on to the last leg to the target, Frankfurt. The second attack caused severe damage to the aircraft and set part of the incendiary load alight, forcing us to abandon the plane, and when we bailed out the Flight Engineer and I landed in the same field, but we didnt get to the Cinema that night!

Caught Napping

It was our twentieth operation, the target was Frankfurt and the date was 12th September 1944. I was flying as Navigator in Lancaster LS-M (NF 958), the other members of the crew being FIO N.R. Overend (pilot) a New Zealander; J.D. Jones (Bomb Aimer); R.E. Kendall (Wireless Operator); RJ. Howarth (Flight Engineer); H. Beverton (Mid-upper Gunner) and 1. Spagatner (Rear Gunner). We flew low level across France, only starting our climb when we crossed the German border. At 22.45 as we turned on to the last leg into the target there was a cry of 'Port Go' from the Rear gunner; immediately we plunged into that sickening corkscrew known to all Bomber aircrew, and as we levelled out there was an almighty bang from underneath the Wireless Operators position. Flames rapidly broke through into the fuselage and we realised that we had been hit in the bomb bay, and the incendiary load was alight. The pilot struggled with the controls for a moment or two but, as the flames began to spread across the port wing, he gave the order to bail-out. B.J., the Flight Engineer, went first through the nose hatch, followed by myself, then the Bomb Aimer, while the two Gunners exited through the rear door. I estimate that we baled out at around 12,000 feet, and in the darkness of the night it seemed a long way down. Shortly after we had escaped the aircraft blew up, throwing out the Wireless Operator, who remembers nothing of that incident, and killing the Pilot.

Hitting the ground, I realised that there was another parachutist on the corner of the field in which I had landed, and making my way to him found it to be B.J. our Flight Engineer. Neither of us were injured in any way, so burying our chutes we decided to make tracks and get as far away as we could from the scene of our landing.

That night we simply headed in a southwest direction, keeping to fields and avoiding any roads. At one point we came to a large enclosed area, surrounded by high fencing, which we had to go around. Eventually, as dawn approached we found ourselves on the bank of a fast flowing river - there was a bridge downstream, with the occasional vehicle crossing it. The heavily wooded area on the other bank looked most inviting but prudence dictated that we should stay where we were, as the chances of being spotted as we crossed the bridge were too high for our liking.

As daylight came we could see that we were on the edge of a farm, the buildings of which could be seen some two hundred yards from were we were lying in long grass - fortunately the steep bank on which we lay hid us from the farm but we kept a watchful eye in case anyone came in our direction.

The day passed slowly. We had one Escape Kit between the two of us - B.J. had left his in the aircraft - so we had a couple of Horlicks tablets and risked sharing a cigarette, being careful to blow the smoke into the long grass. It proved to be a very long day, as we lay there waiting for darkness to fall.

As night came so too did the rain. And how it rained! We made our way to the bridge and got across it without any difficulty, then dived into the woods we had seen. And still it rained; so much so that we were obliged to seek shelter, and there was precious little about. An upturned tin bath, which we came across, when held over our heads provided only token cover, and the noise of the rain falling on it forced us to discard our primitive shelter. A thicker clump of trees provided some relief from the rain and we remained there for much of our second night, only resuming our escape attempt when it got a bit lighter. We were following a main road, while staying within cover of the trees, and there seemed to be only military vehicles passing from time to time. As it got lighter we decided to call a halt and get some rest - in any event, we had had little sleep so far. A clump of low scrub provided enough shelter and so we lay down and went to sleep.

It would be difficult to say that we slept well. Periodically, we would waken up and check that there was no one approaching our hideout. The occasional noise of traffic could be heard on the road some distance away - it seemed possible that this was a main route to the south and we took the decision to follow it. We were encouraged to believe that we might yet get out of Germany, and, with luck, get back to Britain.

Up to this point the lack of food had not been of great concern. We still had some Horlicks tablets and a chewy bar in the Escape Kit. We also had a fishing line and a hook, but could not imagine us sitting by a stream while we dangled the line in the expectation that we might catch a fish. Some matches, a water bottle and water purification tablets completed our equipment. I had in my possession a pencil, which when broken open revealed a miniature compass, while B.J. being a pipe-smoker had a tobacco pouch, which, he proclaimed had a map inside. Ripping open the pouch, we were somewhat disappointed to find a map of southern France, and we had a long way to go before it would be of any practical use to us.

Late that afternoon we decided that it would be safe enough to begin walking, provided we stayed within cover of the woods, so off we set. It was slow progress as we constantly had to be on the alert, and every now and then we would stop and listen for any unwelcome sounds. Gradually, as it got darker within the woods, we edged our way nearer to the road and at times walked along it in an endeavour to cover a greater distance. It was a single track road, and not, as we had imagined, a major thoroughfare; it also ran fairly straight so that we could hear, and even see, any approaching vehicle, whereupon we would dive into cover and remain hidden for a suitable period. We continued walking throughout the night, albeit at a fairly slow pace, and as daylight came we found that we were nearing some open country, with a few buildings set well back from the road. Then we had some good fortune by coming across apple trees growing by the roadside. We hastily filled our pockets and made our way across a field towards an old barn where we though we might find cover for that day. We approached the barn with caution, but it did seem to be disused and sure enough when we got inside we had the firm impression that nobody had been in it for some considerable time. A ladder led up to a hayloft and we settled down there, taking turns to sleep and keep watch. During one of my watch periods I came across a bundle of old newspapers and magazines - I could not read them but I thumbed through the pages looking at the odd photographs. Amazingly, I came across a map, which was part of a an advert for a petrol company, and it covered the very area we were in. It was somewhat rumpled, and torn in places, but I stuffed it into my pocket, feeling sure that it would prove useful in the days that lay ahead.

Feeling refreshed, we ate some of the apples and as dusk settled over the countryside we continued on our way. So far as I could judge we had covered some 50 to 60 miles, and were south of Mannheim and heading in the direction of Karlsruhe. We were still making slow progress, keeping to fields, passing through wooded areas, and trying at all times to remain invisible. This night we again experienced rain, and as it got heavier we decided that there was no alternative but to seek shelter yet again. This proved to more difficult than we had expected, but eventually we came to a bridge over an autobahn and took shelter below it at a point as high up from the autobahn as we could find. It proved to be just right for our purpose for, while we could watch the odd vehicle that passed along the road they were unable to detect our presence in the darkness. Thus passed a few miserable hours.

As dawn approached we thought it best to get away from this location, so returned to the fields and continued our walk. We were getting a bit blase by this time, and took the decision to continue walking through the day. As events were to prove this was a day we would not forget in a hurry. At one point we could see workers in a distant field, but if they saw us they took no notice. Boldness overcame us and we ventured on to a quiet country road in an endeavour to cover a greater distance. Some miles on our way we spotted a civilian type truck parked by the roadside. There did not appear to be anyone with it so we approached it carefully, possibly thinking that we might be able to use the vehicle to get us further on our way. There was no obvious way that we could have got it started, which led us to abandon the idea of driving off in style, Before leaving the truck, however, we had noticed a packet lying beside the driver's seat; on closer examination we found it to contain two chunks of bread and some sausage. We could not pass up the opportunity to vary our diet a little, and to this day I wonder what the driver thought about his missing lunch, if that is what it was.

The decision to keep to the road was almost our downfall, for turning a bend in the road a few miles on, we saw ahead a group of houses on either side of the road, with one or two women and children actually within sight of us - indeed, it seemed that they had observed our approach. What to do? Walk on, we agreed! So, putting on a bold front we walked straight ahead at a steady but not fast pace - we nodded to the women as we passed and kept going. My spine was tingling but we dared not look back. Another bend in the road and we were out of view of the women.

Heaving sighs of relief we stepped out a bit faster to get as far away as we could from the hamlet we had passed through. It is perhaps worth mentioning that we had taken the decision not to remove any badges from our uniforms, which meant that we were still wearing our flying badges and our stripes, and yet we had not been recognised.

Later in the day we came across a workmans hut by the roadside and as it was deserted we took the decision to rest for a while inside. It stood back a little from the road, and behind it was a thinly spaced wood. A knothole in the wall facing the road gave us the advantage of viewing anyone approaching. Then the unexpected happened. An army vehicle drew up alongside. As we watched, the driver and a woman got down from the cab. Hell! Were they coming to the hut? Fortunately, they passed behind and went into the wood, re-emerging some ten minutes later. The purpose of their visit was all too obvious, and we watched them climb back into the truck and drive off. If they were satisfied, so too were we!

That was enough excitement for one day, and certainly more than we had experienced in our travels thus far. To avoid another encounter with any of the local population, we kept to the fields and woods for the remainder of that day, and chose to spend the night as 'babes in the wood' once again.

Starting out the next day it was quite apparent that we were suffering from a lack of nourishment. We both felt a bit light headed from time to time and as the day wore on we realised that we needed to find another lorry with a supply of bread and sausage. No such luck, however! Taking it easy, and resting for longer periods in between walking meant that it was going to take longer to get out of Germany than we had imagined. Never mind, just keep going and hope for the best. Later in the day we came across a vast potato field and filled our pockets in preparation for a bean feast that night. We still had a few apples we had gathered earlier in the day and this gave us the prospect of a better repast. The hours of darkness came at last - we were still walking and had returned to a quiet country road on which we saw neither persons nor vehicles. When we came across another hut, again set back a little from the road, we claimed it as our own for the night. There was an added bonus in that this hut contained a stove; ideal for roasting our potatoes, so B.J. foraged for some wood while I went off to find a stream we could hear nearby in order to fill the water bottle. In my wearied state I misjudged the bank and finished ankle deep in the stream. Returning to the hut I took off my shoes and hung my socks above the stove, now alight, and waited for the potatoes to roast. They were excellent, and the apple desert finished off our evening meal. Before settling down to sleep I went out of the hut to relieve myself and to my horror saw flames spouting two or three feet high out of the chimney. A dead giveaway to any passing traffic, so out went the fire and we turned in for our rest.

The next morning was sunny and warm. We resumed our trek and by this time I was estimating that we had covered a fair distance although by no means sure where we were having run off the map I had earlier acquired. Still, we were in reasonably good heart and feeling a bit stronger after our meal the night before. Nevertheless we were walking at a slower pace and we took time to rest more often. The result was that we had probably covered little more than a dozen miles during that day. As evening came we found another road heading in what we though would be the right direction - it led us into the outskirts of a town of some size, so far as we could judge in the dark, and we were wondering what to do next when we heard approaching footsteps. Diving into a garden of a house, we hid behind shrubs until the figure passed, then re-emerged to continue on our way, still wondering what action to take.

A little further on we spied a railway yard and decided to investigate. Would there be any trains that might take us out of Germany? We never did get the answer to that question as we were suddenly confronted by a uniformed person who took a great interest in us. He spoke to us, obviously asking questions, but as we could not understand a word we just stood our ground and shrugged our shoulders. Bemused perhaps, our questioner eventually lost interest and wandered off. We wasted no time in getting out of that yard and hightailing it down the road with a view to getting as far as we could out of that town, a town we were later to learn was called Rastatt.

We walked at a fair pace and when we judged that we were a good few miles out of the town we looked for some place where we could lie up for the rest of the night. There were woods on both sides of the road, but which to choose? We chose to go right and when we were some little distance away from the road we found a hollow under some low scrub, which we settled in for our resting place, and soon we were asleep. I must have slept soundly until I was rudely shaken awake by B.J. who whispered in my ear, 'Look whose coming!' I did look and my heart sank immediately, for there were four German soldiers bearing down on us with rifles and fixed bayonets. There was no chance of escape, and as I looked around I spied an elderly man standing well back watching proceedings - he had in his arm a bundle of wood and it was all too obvious that he had come across us as he searched for wood, and reported us to the military.

As events were to prove he had not had far to go to turn us in, for we had selected as our resting place a spot some two hundred yards from a German Army camp, which we had not seen through the trees while it was dark. We had truly been caught napping!

We were taken back to this camp two or three officers appeared and scrutinised us at close quarters before removing our shoes, presumably to avoid us making a run for it. We stood there not knowing what would happen next. The most senior officer, or so he appeared, stood looking at us in some amusement. Eventually a truck was brought along, we were invited to get aboard - we had no choice - and we were driven back into the town we had walked through the previous evening. What appeared to be the local county jail was our destination, where we were searched then placed in separate cells. I was surprised that the search they made of us had been carried out in a careless manner, for they had missed my escape kit box, which was by now near empty, and a knife I had in my possession. After about an hour in the cell, the door was opened and an officer and senior N.C.O. entered. The officer stood and looked at me while the N.C.O. snapped 'English?' at me. I do not know what prompted me to say 'No', but that was my reply, whereupon the N.CO. shouted 'American?' Again I answered 'No'. The N.C.O. looked puzzled, but the officer smiled and said in almost faultless English, 'Well if you are not English and not American, what are you?' 'Scottish,' I replied. At this the officer turned and said a few words to the N.C.O. who then left the cell and I was left alone with the officer. Curiously, he did not try to interrogate me. Instead, he explained that he had gone to Oxford University pre-war, which no doubt explained his near perfect English. He did say, however, that an Austrian Regiment had picked us up, and that for me the war was over. A few minutes later the N.C.O. returned bearing a tray with a plate of meat and potatoes on it, together with a mug of coffee, then they left me to enjoy my first real meal in eight days. The following day I met up with B.J. when we were moved to another prison some miles away. I was a little amused to learn that when the German officer and N.C.O. had confronted B.J. in his cell, and asked if he was English he had acknowledged the fact, only to be left alone without anything to eat - it was some hours later before he received some bread, cold meat and coffee. Obviously, being Scottish paid off!

Eventually we were taken to Frankfurt and found ourselves in Dulag Luft for interrogation. By this time the attack on Arnhem had taken place and the number of airborne prisoners was such that we were soon moved out to our Prison Camp, Stalag Luft VII in Upper Silesia, which we reached after a train journey occupying several days. At this time we met up with our Bomb Aimer and Wireless Operator, and were more than pleased on arrival at the Camp to find that Spagatner, our Rear Gunner had got there before us. As we were later to have confirmed, the Pilot had indeed been killed in the aircraft, and our Mid-upper Gunner had also been killed, but how and when we never did learn.


F/Lt Geoffrey Ware, DFC AE FCA
F/Lt Geoffrey Ware, DFC AE FCA

Started his RAF career in December 1940 at No 1 Receiving Wing Babbacombe, then No 4 Initial Training Wing at Paignton. A long wait in the Liverpool area during which it was sunbathing or fatigues, led to a five-week trip in convoy to South Africa. There followed an enthralling year in what was then Southern Rhodesia for Elementary Flying Training on Tiger Moths and Service Flying Training on Harvards leading to the award of Wings. Instead of being sent to the Middle East, as was normal, a fast, unescorted trip took a boatload of fledgling pilots and navigators back to the UK. It appeared that the strategy of the war had changed and the emphasis was then on the build up of Bomber Command and therefore he was converted to multi-engined aircraft on Oxfords at South Cerney and on Wellingtons at further conversion to Stirlings at Waterbeach, plus two further crew members (making a crew of seven) and on to an operational tour with XV Squadron at Bourn and the award of the WC. It may be appropriate here to mention that the navigator was Brian E.B. Harris, DFC who has provided pictures and information to the authors of Oxford's Own (a history of XV Squadron) and The Stirling. He has also produced a video tape called Remember The Stirling. Brian is now the Chairman of 7he Stirling Project' which is a charity devoted to trying to build a Stirling aircraft for display purposes. (for further details tel: 01483 892626) Following the appropriate training F/Lt Ware became an Instructor at an Operational Training Unit and was Mentioned in Dispatches. After the War was over he transferred to Transport Command and spent the rest of his time in the RAF flying Liberators, mostly empty, to Karachi, and returning with 26 passengers, mostly troops. It was not easy to give up flying completely and he remained with the RAFVR and the RAux AF until they closed down, as a relief from and transition to, training to be a Chartered Accountant.
Squadrons for : Stirling
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No.101 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 12th July 1917

Mens agitat molem - Mind over matter

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No.101 Sqn RAF

No 101 Squadron was formed on 12th July 1917 and based at South Farnborough. The squadron was commanded by Major The Hon L J E Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes, and by the end of July the squadron was sent to France where 101 Squadron was to become the second specialist night-bomber unit in the Royal Flying Corps. 101 Squadron was equipped with the FE2b two-seat pusher bi-plane and on the 20th September 1917 began flying night bombing missions during the Battle of Menin Ridge. 101 1quadron continued night bombing missions during the 3rd Battle of Ypres and the Battle of Cambrai. 101 squadron attacked several German long-range night bomber airfields during February 1918 and these missions were among the first offensive counter air operations and up until the end of the war continued bombing missions. After the First World War 101 squadron were based in Belgium until March 1919 when returning to Britian and disbanded on the 31st December. No.101 squadron reformed on the 21st March 1928 at RAF Bircham Newton and in March 1929 the squadron was issued with the new bomber the Boulton and Paul Sidestrand. The squadron moved to RAF Andover iIn October 1929 where it remained until December 1934 when 101 squadron moved to RAF Bicester and issued with the the improved Boulton Paul Overstrand, which featured the first powered gun turret in RAF aircraft as well as othe rmodifications including more powerful engines. The Boulton Paul Overstrand is displayed on 101 Squadron's official badge. In June 1938 No 101 Squadron re-equipped with Bristol Blenheim and was stationed now at RAF West Raynham in May 1939, as part of No 2 Group, Bomber Command. When World War Two broke out 101 Squadron were stationed at RAF Brize Norton, but returned to West Raynham. It was not until the fall of France when the squadron became operational but suffered a set back when its officer commanding, Wg Cdr J H Hargroves, and his crew were lost on its first bombing mission on 5th July 1940. During the Battle of Britain 101 Squadron Blenhiems carried out bombing missions against the German barges in French ports as well as German airfields in France. Another OC 101 Squadron, Wg Cdr D Addenbrooke, was lost on the 3rd April while taking part in a raid on French ports just 3 days after taking command. 101 Squadron were re-equipped with the Vickers Wellington in April 1940 and were based at RAF Oakington and became part of No 3 Group bomber command. On the 24th July 101 Squadron lost its first Wellington on a raid against Brest. Ten Wellingtons of 101 Squadron took part in the first 1,000 bomber raid on Cologne, but losses began to mount and between July and September the Squadron lost 20 Wellingtons with 86 aircrew killed. In September 101 Squadron moved to RAF Holme-on-Spalding-Moor in Septmber 1942 and became the first operational Avro Lancaster squadron in No 1 Group.Bomber Command. 101 squadron moved to its final wartime base, RAF Ludford Magna on 15th June 1943. 101 Squadrons Lancasters took part in the raids on Hamburg and the raid on the secret German rocket site at Peenemunde. Over the winter of 1943-1944 No.101 squadron took part in the raid on Berlin but suffered high casualties. On the 31st March 1944, during the Nuremberg Raid, 101 Squadron lost 7 Lancasters and crews out of 26 dispatched. In the spring and summer of 1944 101 squadron attacked targets in France in preparation for and support of the allied invasion of Normandy. On D-Day, the squadron used ABC to jam nightfighter controllers to protect the British airborne landings. After D-Day 101 squadron continued raids on German cities with their last bombing mission on Berchtesgarden on 25th April 1945. 101 bomber squadron suffered the highest casualties of any Royal Air Force Squadron during the Second World War, losing 1176 aircrew killed in action. In October 1945, the Squadron moved to RAF Binbrook and later equipped with Avro Lincolns. In May 1952 101 squadorn became the first bomber squadron to receive the first Jet Bomber the English Electric Canberra B2 and in 1954 were stationed in Malaya carrying out bombing misisons against terrorist targets. In October 1956 during the Suez crisis to Malta for Operation MUSKETEER bombing raids against Egypt befroe being disbanded in February 1957 but in 1959 101 squadron was reformed and re equipped with the new Avro Vulcan B1 and the first squadorn to be armed with the British H Bomb, In 1961 101 squadron moved to RAF Waddington. In 1968 the squadron was equipped with the new Vulcan B2 . In 1982,101 Squadron Vulcans took part in Operation CORPORATE, during the Falklands War. A 101 Squadron crew carried out the first and last Operation BLACKBUCK Vulcan conventional bombing raids on Argentinean forces occupying Port Stanley in the Falkland Islands. These 8,000 mile round trip missions required extensive use of Air to Air refuelling. After the Falklands war 101 squadron was equipped with VC10s and supplied fighter aircraft with air to air refuelling during all major conflicts form Bosnia, to Operation Desert Storm and continues today in this role.

No.138 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 20th September 1918
Fate : Disbanded 1st April 1962.

For Freedom

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No.138 Sqn RAF

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No.149 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st March 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st August 1956
East India

Fortis nocte - Strong by night

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No.149 Sqn RAF

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No.15 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st March 1915

Aim sure

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No.15 Sqn RAF

On 1st March 1915, the officers and men who made up No.1 Reserve Squadron and the Recruits Depot, all of whom were based at South Farnborough, Hampshire, were brought together to form No.15 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Initially, the new squadron was equipped with a diverse range of flying machines, including Henri and Maurice Farmans, Avros, Bleriots, Moranes and BE2c aircraft. Having relocated to an airfield at Hounslow, west of London, where the squadron was allowed time to work up to operational status, it was, on 11th May, relocated to another airfield at Swingate Down, to the east of Dover, on the Kent coast. On 23rd December 1915, No.15 Squadron, RFC, deployed to France for operational duties. Throughout its time on the Western Front, during the First World War, the squadron was engaged in observation and reconnaissance duties, initially using BE2c aircraft but later, during June 1916, upgrading to R.E.8s. The work undertaken by the squadron, in its reconnaissance role, was recognised by higher authority, on a number of occasions, in the form of telegrams or communiqus. On 1st April 1918, No.15 Squadron became part of the newly formed Royal Air Force, which came into being with the amalgamation of the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Naval Air Service. With the end of hostilities in November 1918, came a reduction in the fighting strength of the RAF and, although not disbanded as a number of squadrons were, No.15 was reduced to a cadre. The axe finally fell on the final day of December 1919, when No.15 Squadron was disbanded.

It was to be approximately five years before No.15s number plate was to be resurrected when, on 20th March 1924, No.15 Squadron was reformed as part of the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment (A&AEE), at Martlesham Heath, Suffolk. Over a period of ten years, No.15 Squadron completed 12,100 flying hours on over seventy-five different types of airframe. Over that same period, it also saw five changes of commanding officer.

On 1st June 1934, No.15 was re-designated as a new unit, equipped with Hawker Hart Mk.I aircraft, undertaking daylight operations flying as part of Bomber Command. The new C.O. was Squadron Leader Thomas Elmhirst, who secured permission for his squadron to change the number plate to Roman numerals and have the XV applied to the fuselage on all the squadrons aircraft. This decision was to have a lasting effect and was only interrupted by the Second World War. Thomas Elmhirst also gave thought to the fact the squadron should have its own badge and motto, both of which were approved, during 1935. In early 1936, the squadron re-equipped with Hawker Hind bomber aircraft. These machines remained in service with No.XV until 13th July 1938, when the unit converted to Fairey Battle bomber aircraft. It was with the latter aircraft that the squadron prepared for war when, on 27th August 1939, a state of emergency was declared.

History repeated itself when the Squadron returned to France on a war footing, but it was forced to return to England in order to re-equip with the Bristol Blenheim bomber. The new aircraft was initially seen as a wonder aircraft, but No.XV Squadron was virtually decimated in strength following the German invasion of the Netherlands in May 1940. With the Blenheim being designated unsuitable for the task, the squadron began converting to the Vickers Wellington bomber, designed by Barnes Wallace, on 7th November 1940. This was really a stop-gap measure as on 30th April 1941 No.XV began converting to the Short Stirling, four-engine, heavy bomber. During the next couple of years, night after night, the squadron carried the fight back to the enemy, enduring many losses and exploits of valour in the process. It participated in all the 1,000 bomber raids against Germany.

As 1943 drew to a close, No.XV prepared to continue the fight with new equipment. Having converted to the Avro Lancaster bomber in late December 1943, the squadron went operational in mid-January 1944 with its new aircraft. By the time the war came to an end, No.XV was flying Lancaster B.1 Specials, which were specially adapted to carry 22,000lb Grand Slam bombs. February 1947 saw another change of equipment when the squadron converted to the Avro Lincoln bomber, whilst based at RAF Wyton in Huntingdonshire. However, by the end of that same year, No.XV found itself deploying aircraft to Shallufa, Egypt, as part of Operation Sunrise.

Another change of occurred at the end of November 1950, when No.XV Squadron was disbanded but immediately reformed with Boeing B29 Washington bomber aircraft. It was during the Washington period, in March 1951, that the squadrons code letters LS, which it had been adopted during late 1939, were removed from the aircraft fuselages. The new scheme called for a natural metal finish, adorned with only the RAF roundel, fin flash and aircraft serial. With technology advancing all the time, No.XV entered a new phase in its history in June 1953, when it was declared fully operational flying English Electric Canberra bombers. During the next couple of years, the squadron continued to train and undertook many navigational and bombing exercises, which proved fruitful in 1956 when the Suez crises erupted. No.XV was deployed to Nicosia, as part of Operation Accumulate, on 23rd October. During the short period of fighting that followed, No.XV dropped a higher concentration of bombs than any other squadron. Following a cease-fire, the squadron returned to England where, on 15th April 1957, it was disbanded.

The 1st of September 1958 saw the re-formation of No.XV as a V-Bomber squadron, equipped with Handley Page Victor B.I bombers. These aircraft were not only adorned with the official RAF insignia described above, but were also permitted to carry the squadron badge, together with the Roman XV numerals. The squadron retained these aircraft until 1964 when it was again disbanded. For a period of five years No.XV Squadron ceased to exist. However, this changed on 1st October 1970, when the squadron number plate and badge were resurrected and No.XV was reformed at RAF Honnington, in Suffolk. Equipped with Blackburn S.2B Buccaneer aircraft, the squadron departed for RAF Laarbruch, where, during January 1971, it officially became part of Royal Air Force Germany. After thirteen years service with the squadron, the Buccaneers were replaced with Panavia Tornado, swing-wing, bombers. On 1st September 1983, No.XV became the first RAF Squadron in Germany to be equipped with this type of aircraft. During the latter quarter of 1990, No.XV had deployed two flights, totalling twelve crews, to Muharraq Air Base, on Bahrain Island, in readiness for operations against the Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. During the following conflict, two aircraft crewed by XV Squadron personnel were shot down, resulting in the loss of Flt Lt Stephen Hicks and the capture of Flt Lts John Peters, John Nichol and Rupert Clark.

The squadron returned to RAF Laarbruch at the end of March 1991, where a number of awards, for service in the Gulf War were announced. Wing Commander John Broardbent was awarded a Distinguished Service Order, whilst Sqn Ldr Gordon Buckley and Sqn Ldr Nigel Risdale were both awarded Distinguished Flying Crosses. Senior Engineering Officer S/L Rob Torrence was awarded the Member of the British Empire. Following disbandment in January 1992, No.XV was reformed a few months later on 1st April, at RAF Honnington, where it took on the role of the Tornado Weapons Conversion Unit. It was also granted the status of a Reserve Squadron. No.XV (R) Squadron remained at Honnington until 1st November 1993, when it re-located to RAF Lossiemouth, Moray, Scotland. During January 1998, it was re-designated as the Tornado GR1 Operational Conversion Unit and equipped with the up-graded Tornado GR4 variant. In 2011, just four years away from its 100th anniversary, No.XV (R) Squadron still operates from RAF Lossiemouth, providing refresher crews and new crews to the front line squadrons.


Text by kind permission of Martyn Ford Jones

No.158 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 4th September 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st December 1945

Strength in unity

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No.158 Sqn RAF

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No.171 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 15th June 1942
Fate : Disbanded 27th July 1945

Per dolum defendimus - Confound the enemy

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No.171 Sqn RAF

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No.190 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 24th October 1917
Fate : Disbanded 21st January 1946

Ex tenebris - Through darkness

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No.190 Sqn RAF

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No.196 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 7th November 1942
Fate : Disbanded 16th March 1946

Sie fidem servamus - Thus we keep the faith

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No.196 Sqn RAF

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No.199 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st June 1917
Fate : Disbanded 15th December 1958

Let tyrants tremble

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No.199 Sqn RAF

Based at Lakenheath, August 1943.

No.214 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 28th January 1977
Federated Malay States

Ulter in umbris - Avenging in the shadows

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No.214 Sqn RAF

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No.218 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 24th April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 23rd August 1963
Gold Coast

In time

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No.218 Sqn RAF

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No.295 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 3rd August 1942
Fate : Disbanded 31st October 1948

In caelo auxilium - Aid from the skies,/i>

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No.295 Sqn RAF

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No.299 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 4th November 1943
Fate : Disbanded 15th February 1946

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No.46 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 19th April 1916
Fate : Disbanded 31st August 1975.
Uganda

We rise to conquer

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No.46 Sqn RAF

No. 46 Squadron was formed on the 19th April 1916 and based at RAF Wyton base. In October 1916, 46 Squadron moved to France and was equipped with the two seater Nieuport. 46 Squadrons role was artillery spotting and reconnaissance until May 1917 when 46 squadron were re equipped with the fighter the Sopwith Pup. 46 Squadron operated as part of the 11th Army Wing, and saw many engagements with the enemy. Returning to England and based at Sutton's Farm, Essex, the squadron took part in the defence of London, in July 1917. London had been bombed several times by German Gotha Bombers but after 46 Squadrons patrols no enemy aircraft managed to bomb London in their area. Later 46 squadorn returned to France at the end of August 1917 and in November the squadorn was re equipped with the Sopwith Camel and participated in the Battle of Cambrai protecting the ground troops. In November 1917, Lieutenant (later Major) Donald Maclaren joined 46 Squadron. His first dogfight was not until February 1918, but in the last 9 months of the war Donald Maclaren was credited with shooting down 48 aeroplanes and six balloons, making him one of the top aces of World War I. By November 1918, 46 Squadron had claimed 184 air victories, creating 16 aces. After the First World War had ended the squadorn returned to England and was disbanded on the 31st of December 1919. The outbreak of war found 46 Squadron at RAF Digby, equipped with Hawker Hurricanes. Action with the enemy came quickly when, at the end of October 1939, Squadron Leader Barwell and Pilot Officer Plummer attacked a formation of 12 Heinkel 115s, destroying one each, and scattering the remainder. The next six months were uneventful, consisting in the main of providing air cover for the shipping convoys steaming along the East Coast - a few enemy aircraft were sighted but no contacts were made. In May 1940, the squadron was selected to form part of the Expeditionary Force in Norway, which had been invaded by the Germans on 9th April. The Hurricanes were embarked on HMS Glorious and, despite doubts that a Hurricane could take off from a carrier flight deck in a flat calm, they all took to the air without difficulty, thanks to the efforts of the ship's engineers, who managed to get the Glorious up to a speed of 30 knots. No.46 Squadron assembled at Bardufoss and began operation on 26 May. Patrols were maintained over the land and naval forces at Narvik without respite, some of the pilots going without sleep for more than 48 hours. Conditions on the ground were very basic with poor runways and primitive servicing and repair facilities. Many air combats took place, and in its brief campaign in Norway the squadron accounted for at least 14 enemy aircraft, besides probably destroying many others. On 7th June the squadron was ordered to evacuate Norway immediately and, on the night of 7th through 8th June, the Hurricanes were successfully flown back to Glorious a dangerous procedure as none of the aircraft were fitted with deck arrester hooks. The ground parties embarked on HMS Vindictive and SS Monarch of Bermuda and reached the UK safely, but the squadron's aircraft and eight of its pilots were lost when Glorious was sunk by German warships on 9th June 1940. The two pilots who survived were the Squadron Commander, Squadron Leader (later Air Chief Marshal) Bing Cross, and the Flight Commander, Flight Lieutenant (later Air Commodore) Jamie Jameson.

No.51 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 15th May 1916

Swift and sure

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No.51 Sqn RAF

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No.513 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 15th September 1943
Fate : Disbanded 21st November 1943

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No.513 Sqn RAF

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No.570 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 15th November 1943
Fate : Disbanded 28th December 1945

Impetum deducimus - We launch the spearhead

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No.570 Sqn RAF

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No.620 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 17th June 1943
Fate : Disbanded 1st September 1946
Transport Command

Dona ferentes adsumas - We are bringing gifts

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No.620 Sqn RAF

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No.622 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 10th August 1943
Fate : Disbanded 30th September 1953

Bellamus nocta - We make war by night

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No.622 Sqn RAF

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No.623 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 10th August 1943
Fate : Disbanded 6th December 1943

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No.623 Sqn RAF

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No.7 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st May 1914

Per diem per noctem - By day and by night

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No.7 Sqn RAF

No.7 Squadron was formed 1st May 1914 at Farnborough as a Scout squadron, and went to France April 1915, equipped with the Vickers Gunbus. No.7 squadron saw service through the war with BE2c, RE5 and RE8 aircraft. The squadron pioneered the use of R/T (instead of normal W/T), using it operationally for the first time in October 1918. Disbanded at Farnborough on 31st December 1919 it reformed at Bircham Newton on 1st June 1923 equipped with Vickers Vimy bombers. These were replaced by the Vickers Virginia after moving to Worthy Down in April 1927. Between the wars No.7 squadron was equipped with various aircraft including the Handley Page Heyfords, Vickers Wellesleys and Armstrong Whitworth Whitleys and became the leading bomber squadron, winning the Laurence Minot Memorial Bombing Trophy more than any other squadron. At the outbreak of World War II, the squadron was equipped with Handley Page Hampdens, until August 1940, when it equipped with the RAF's first four engined bomber, the Short Stirling Mk I - becoming the first RAF squadron to be equipped with four engined bombers. The first raid by No.7 was 10th February 1941 on Rotterdam. The squadron settled down to a night bombing role, adding mine laying to its duties in 1942. Later with four other squadrons, it formed the nucleus of the new Pathfinder Force, its task to find and accurately mark targets with flares. In May 1943, the Stirling (which was handicapped by a low operational ceiling - it had to fly through flak rather than over it) was gradually replaced by the Avro Lancaster, which No.7 used in Peenemunde in August. From June1944 and until the end of the war, the squadron also undertook a daylight operational role in support of land forces in France and the low countries, and against V-1 and V-2 sites. No.7 squadron flew to Singapore in January 1947, and converted to Avro Lincolns, seeing action against Communist terrorists in Malay, during 'Operation Firedog'. Returning to UK, having won the Laurence Minot Memorial Bombing Trophy outright for the eighth time it was disbanded 1st January 1956. Reforming in November of the same year with the Vickers Valiant 'V' bomber. Disbanded on 30th September 1962, it was reformed in May 1970 at RAF St. Mawgan on target provision duties. Equipped with the English Electric Canberra, the squadron provided targets for the Army and Navy anti aircraft guns. They also provided silent targets for radar station practice. On 12th December 1981 the squadron was again disbanded, reforming soon after as the second operational Boeing Vertol Chinook helicopter Squadron on 2nd September 1982.

No.75 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 1st October 1916
Fate : Disbanded 15th October 1945
New Zealand

Ake ake kia kaha - For ever and ever be strong

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No.75 Sqn RAF

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No.90 Sqn RAF


Country : UK
Founded : 8th October 1917
Fate : Disbanded 1st March 1965

Celer - Swift

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No.90 Sqn RAF

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